• Teamsters Charge CAAP Blows Smoke

    • 08/04/2017
    • Paul Rosenberg
    • News
    • Comments are off

    By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

    On July 20, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach released the draft of their new Clean Air Action Plan, opening a two-month comment period.

    The first public comment was a resounding rejection from the Teamsters, because the plan would tacitly allow the continued exploitation of individual truckers, misclassified as independent owner-operators. These truckers were saddled with the lion’s share of the costs of the Clean Trucks Program in the initial plan — hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

    “Your clean air program is going to make it worse, because the actual people who paid for the last clean trucks program — and it wasn’t designed to be that way — was the drivers, the people [who] can’t afford it,” Teamsters International Vice President Fred Potter told POLA commissioners at their meeting the next day. “They made all the truck payments and most of them — virtually almost every one of them — while they paid for those trucks. They’ll never own them.”

    While the initial program at least tried to protect truckers, the new plan represents a giant step back by not even trying.

    The ports’ press release said the plan “incorporates feedback from nearly two years of extensive dialogue with industry, environmental groups, regulatory agencies and neighboring communities” via “more than 50 stakeholder meetings” since a discussion document was released this past November.

    Conspicuously missing are mentions of truckers and their representatives.

    “We were not asked to participate in these stakeholder meetings,” Potter said. “Yet, we’ve had 15 strikes, represented drivers, helped drivers with hundreds — almost a thousand — DSLE claims [California labor law violations], and class action lawsuits… every one of which they’ve won, because these drivers are misclassified.”

    Teamsters spokesperson Barbara Maynard recalled an incident just before the most recent strike.

    “The mayors of Los Angeles and Long Beach held a press conference and announced that they were going to move to zero-emission trucks,” Maynard said.

    The strike coincided with a major investigative story in USA Today, exposing the illegal exploitative system Potter highlighted.

    But despite the strike, the national exposure and petitions hand-delivered to both mayors, Teamsters were not considered part of the discussion.

    “We did not receive a call, from either port saying, ‘Let’s sit down; let’s talk; let’s have a conversation, and make sure that these costs don’t fall onto the backs of the drivers again, like they did in 2008’,” Maynard said. “So it’s not like the actual announcement [of the Teamsters’ opposition] was a surprise.

    “Teamsters certainly support a clean-air action plan, certainly support zero-emission trucks, certainly would support the newest technology to make our air better and the ports more efficient. But it cannot be and will not be on the backs of the drivers again.”

    But truckers and Teamsters’ participation and a plan to protect truckers from illegal exploitation isn’t all that’s missing from the plan, David Pettit, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council said.

    “Right now, I look at this as a wish list, rather than real plan,” Pettit told Random Lengths News. “There’s no enforceable deadline… there’s no funding mechanism.”

    This makes it similar to the Air Quality Management Plan from the South Coast Air Quality Management District, which sets similar goals with a similar price tag.

    “The price tag is the same, roughly a billion, with a “B”, [dollars] in each case,” Pettit said. “So South Coast wants a billion, the port wants a billion. It’s unclear where that money is going to come from.”

    Making matters worse, the plan envisions two waves of new truck purchases — near-zero trucks dominating in the next decade or longer, eventually followed by zero-emission vehicles. The timing varies across seven different scenarios, but the big picture remains the same: a mess.

    “The idea of doing this twice more, once to some kind of renewable LNG and then again to zero-emissions a few years later, doesn’t make a lot of sense,” Pettit said.

    Around 2008, the port spent about $240 million to help subsidize the clean-air truck fleet, he recalled.

    “I thought at the time, ‘How many times are they going to do this?’” Pettit said. “That’s the conundrum the port has put itself in and the answer is, ‘You just do it once.’”

    Another thing that’s clear, Teamsters say: it’s not going to come from individual truck drivers like Tracy Ellis, a Teamster shop steward who also addressed the commissioners.

    “During the first Clean Truck Program, my employer required me to lease a new truck, and pay all the heavy costs associated with operating that business,” Ellis said. “They got away with it by illegally classifying me as a contractor.”

    The burden was crushing. She lost her house, her car.

    “And, when I got sick, I lost everything,” she said.

    In the existing system, there’s nothing protecting individual truckers. Although Ellis is an employee now, not everyone is so lucky.

    “There are still more than 10,000 drivers working at the ports who are considered the laughingstock of the whole industry and are in the same situation that I used to be in,” she said. “These drivers will be forced to work illegal hours, two jobs, if not more, or do whatever it takes to pay for a new truck. Until every driver is guaranteed that the ports are going to ban companies that are breaking the law, then there should be no new truck replacement program.”

    Ellis, who’s been a port trucker since 2001, expanded on her experience afterwards. When the ports did their first clean truck programs, it had an employee mandate to it, but nobody communicated to the drivers what this really meant, she recalled.

    “We were scared, we were harassed by our employers and the trucking companies, that this wasn’t the way to go, that we better not talk to the Teamsters and this and that,” she said. “So we went along with our employers and sided with them because we didn’t know any better, because there was a big lack of communication, which I think is going on again.”

    At the time, she worked for TTSI.

    “They were very active with the politicians and they were the first ones to come out with a clean trucks, and claiming to be on the forefront of the whole environmental issue,” Ellis recalled.

    But over time, a very different picture emerged. Truckers paid TTSI for everything truck-related, including the truck payment, the fuel, the insurance, the maintenance, tires, all the stuff that has to be paid for, but the promise of building equity was largely a fantasy.

    “They would come out every once in awhile, getting rid of people for various reasons,” she said. “They would take the same truck and release it to someone else.”

    Meanwhile, funding — such as the Pier Pass program — was never passed onto the drivers.

    “As [a] result, when times got slow, or the work got slow, we would end up with negative checks, possibly,” Ellis said.

    She was fortunate until she got sick with diabetes in 2010.

    “I was on injections, you can’t drive a bus, truck or anything like that commercially on injections,” she explained, “So, I was out for a year. I had nothing to fall back on, no Social Security, because I was misclassified.”

    She lost her home, her car, her credit rating — everything, because so-called “independent owner-operators” have virtually no protections of any sort.

    The law is now clearly on their side in a way that wasn’t yet clear a decade ago. An exhaustive 2010 report, The Big Rig Poverty, Pollution, and the Misclassification of Truck Drivers at America’s Ports, established that port truckers are employees under existing labor law, which has been confirmed by hundreds of lawsuits and labor law decisions since. A 2014 follow-up, The Big Rig Overhaul, surveyed the progress made and projected that California “port trucking companies operating in California are annually liable for wage and hour violations of $787 to $998 million each year. The true figure probably lies in the middle of this range at around $850 million per year.”

    A substantial portion of that total is due to clean truck costs; while millions in damages have been recovered, the vast majority of law-breaking still goes unpunished. That’s what the Teamsters are determined to change.

    “I don’t think the port would have much of a chance in going to court and saying, ‘Well, these guys are all employees,’” said Pettit because of past rulings that the ports lack standing to make that case. “But the employees themselves can certainly do that, and I believe that there’ve been several hundred reclassification cases brought before the California labor commission, most of which have been successful.”

    “Every one of which they have won,” Potter told the commissioners.

    But truckers also argue that the ports can do more. The past rulings came down before misclassification law was clarified regarding port truckers. Ports do have a right — even a responsibility — to require lawful conduct. Misclassification doesn’t just hurt truckers, it gives an unfair advantage to law-breaking companies over law-abiding ones, deprives government of tax revenue and creates hazardous working conditions, endangering the public as well as drivers.

    “The only way a person can make it with a clean truck is illegally,” Ellis told Random Lengths. “The legal work hours mandated through the Department of Transportation are 11 hours [a day] and the harbors have sidestepped that issue. There’s no accountability of how long or how often the truck can come in and get loads and leave. It’s like the wild, wild West.”

    The law is now clear-cut.

    “[Even though the law is not clear cut,] you allow lawbreakers to come and work in the port,” Potter told the commissioners. “[You] might as well put up a sign, ‘Lawbreakers welcome, come exploit the workers.’”

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  • POW! WOW! Long Beach

    • 08/04/2017
    • Terelle Jerricks
    • Art
    • Comments are off

    Packing a Punch on the Mural Scene

    By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

    Twenty-two artists and art teams put up 21 murals on the sides of Long Beach buildings and walled fences in the span of a week this past July in an event called POW! WOW!

    Six of the 22 artists are based in Long Beach, including Bodeck Hernandez, Nate Frizzell, Noelle Martinez, Ryan Milner, Dave Van Patten and Sparc. Community members got to participate through a series of events designed to connect them with the mural artists.

    This was the third year for POW! WOW! in Long Beach. That lifespan becomes increasingly impressive in a promotional video in which Julia Huang, chief executive of interTrend Communication, admits that business owners were reluctant to allow their walls to be painted over with spray paint when POW! WOW! first came to town.

    “During our first year, it was difficult to get walls because business owners or building owners didn’t know what it means when we [asked], ‘Want us to spray paint your walls with a spray can?’” Huang said. “Immediately, it was equated to graffiti art.”

    Property owners have since come around and donated wall space. Hundreds of local volunteers have  followed  in support as well.

    POW! WOW! Long Beach has even attracted major sponsors such as the Port of Los Angeles, the City of Long Beach, the Downtown Long Beach Business Association as well as the local art museums,  the Museum of Latin American Art and Long Beach Museum of Art.

    LBMA Director Ron Nelson is credited with changing Long Beach’s attitude towards street art after spearheading the 2015 show Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape. The show brought world-renowned artists to paint temporary murals in LBMA galleries.

    Kamea Hadar, co-lead director of POW! WOW!, recounted the early days and why it started.

    He explained that his high school friend Jasper Wong, who came to run an art gallery, had decided to do a project that highlighted the process of making art. He invited a dozen of his artist friends from different parts of the world to paint, live and work together for a week in Hawaii.

    Jasper maxed out his credit cards, paying for all of the flights and Hadar and his family provided the space for them to live.

    The 12 artists would paint all day on individual canvases and then destroy the work. Thereafter, they would stay up and talk all night about art.

    By the third POW! WOW!, the event gathered 100 international artists together for the purpose of creating art, culture and community as well as sharing these values both in Hawaii and across the globe.

    Street art became the canvas upon which Wong aimed to forge this intentional community. But it wasn’t the only canvas.

    POW! WOW! has also made forays in youth mentorship through Pow Wow School of music.

    PWSoM brings in budding musicians into its mentorship program, pairing them with professional musicians and providing creative, comfortable, and safe spaces for artistic expression.

    Pow! Pow! captured lightning in a jar. The ambitious part is the replication of the lightning worldwide.

    “It has to become an international event,” said Wong in 2012. “Every year, it has to be bigger and it has to be better…. Eventually, it will take over a block, then the neighboring block. Then it will take over a city. Pretty soon we will have so many artists coming …. that the whole city will transform.”

    Wong’s intention behind the first POW! WOW! in Hawaii is still evident in POW! WOW! Long Beach. Through a series of events — including a pop-up shop grand opening at MADE by Millworks, a talk with artist Adele Renault hosted by Jeff Staple and another talk with artist Tatiana Suarez moderated by journalist Sarah Bennett — Wong’s event aims to tear down walls and foster connections through art.

    While reflecting on the collaborative nature of this project, Hadar noted that something of cultural significance doesn’t necessarily have to be an ancient artifact. It can be something that is created today in your backyard.

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  • Waterfront Conflicts

    • 08/03/2017
    • James Preston Allen
    • At Length
    • Comments are off

    Ships, Trucks, Unions and Clean Air

    By James Preston Allen, Publisher

    Not much crosses the waterfront in Southern California’s twin ports that isn’t in the jurisdiction of the International Longshore Workers Union. Every kind of commodity and product, legal or not, comes here from around the world — 42 percent of all imports into the United States, to be exact.  What could possibly go wrong?

    According to recent reports from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, cargo volumes are nearly the highest they’ve ever been.

    The Port of Los Angeles closed its 12-month fiscal year with total cargo volumes of 9.2 million 20-foot units (TEUs). Through the first half of 2017, POLB reports, container throughput grew by 5.1 percent, compared to 2016 which moved 3.5 million TEUs.

    The twin ports also have reported that the combined value of the cargo transiting through the ports amounts to some $450 billion. It would appear that it’s heading for even higher levels of growth in the years to come — as long as there isn’t another recession.

    Still, the recent extension of the ILWU labor contract with the Pacific Maritime Association (the employer group) anticipates growth and avoids any potential disruption to the “supply chain” because of labor strife. This benefits both sides, since neither labor nor management trust what the Trump administration would do with an extended labor dispute on the West Coast. Things could be worse.

    Even the recent Clean Air Action Plan  known as CAAP, and the zero-emissions agreement between the two ports anticipate significant growth in cargo volumes that some estimate could reach as high as 250 percent of the current rate.  Science predicts that if they don’t reduce the exhaust emissions starting now, the increase in cargo volumes will only expand, contributing even more to global warming and endangering the health of millions of Southern California residents. The ones who would be most impacted are those who live or work near the ports.  After all of the advancements to lower those emissions within the past 17 years, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach still remain the single largest source of pollution in the state. So what’s the problem?

    The weak link in this 4450 billion supply chain are the troqueros — the thousands of mostly immigrant truck drivers hired and miss-classified as independent contractors to haul containers in and out of the ports.  The troqueros lease their trucks from the company, pay their own expenses and get paid on a per haul basis. In the end, they are some of the lowest paid workers in the harbor and they don’t like it.

    In fact, they’ve gone on strike 15 times in the past several years and have gone to court suing the various companies over labor abuses. They have won many of these cases, but they still remain an abused labor group.

    International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Fred Potter spoke of the plight of the troqueros at a San Pedro Democratic Club meeting at Ports O’ Call Restaurant this past July and asked for support. His spiel included arguments I’ve heard before, but this time I just happened to be sitting next to ILWU International Vice President Ray Familathe when I heard them.

    Familathe became notably more agitated as Potter talked about the Teamster’s drive to organize the troqueros. During the question-and-answer period, Familathe blasted Potter for entering the ILWU’s jurisdiction without so much as a phone call or a diplomatic communication to organize workers on “our waterfront.”

    The issue also came up last year when then- Congresswoman Janice Hahn wanted to hold a press conference about the plight of the truckers “on the waterfront.”  After some terse words with then-Local 13 President Bobby Olivera Jr. The conference was symbolically moved across Harry Bridges Avenue, oddly enough, to less contested territory. Still, the dispute between the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the ILWU goes back decades to when Harry Bridges himself was president of the ILWU International and the jurisdictional battles were over inland warehouse jobs.

    So, the answer to the questions about what could possibly go wrong with the goods movement industry on the waterfront and why the troqueros still don’t have protections as workers all comes down to the head-butting dispute between these two major labor unions. It’s an issue past mayoral administrations, harbor commission boards and port administrators have never wanted to touch.

    The crux of the matter has as much to do with the Teamsters raiding ILWU locals in San Francisco and Sacramento as it does organizing on the San Pedro waterfront. In the end the greater threat to all workers may well be automation and not who represents the unorganized workforce. Neither side seems well prepared to train the next generation for the onslaught of robotics.

    One thing is for certain, if the ILWU came out to officially endorse these truckers, the stalemate over their status would be over in a minute­. But that presumes the Teamsters would come to an understanding that they would have to have peace in other jurisdictions. Who could bring these two powerful unions to the negotiating table?

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  • Bike Culture Rises

    • 08/03/2017
    • Christian Guzman
    • News
    • Comments are off

    Harbor Area Hosts Its First CicLAvia

    By Christian L. Guzman, Community Reporter

    It’s no easy task bicycling between San Pedro and Wilmington. Although the two communities are connected by a bike path on John S. Gibson Boulevard, cyclists contend with ever-present broken glass, traffic and diesel exhaust. The worst part is the unsettling feeling of fully loaded cargo trucks roaring past at high speeds. It is a far cry from the pleasant promise described in waterfront development plans more than a decade ago.

    CicLAvia will liberate riders from these hazards — for one day, at least — with its San Pedro Meets Wilmington route Sunday, Aug. 13. CicLAvia is both the name of the event and the nonprofit organization that manages it.

    “Many people don’t remember how fun it is to ride a bike,” said Tony Jabuka, owner of The Bike Palace in San Pedro; Jabuka has served bicyclists in San Pedro for more than 35 years. “That’s why CicLAvia is great. It’s a day of fun on your bike.”

    During CicLAvia events, cyclists, skaters and walkers can make full use of certain streets; the route is closed to motorized vehicle traffic.

    “I love the vibes of CicLAvia,” said Ednita Kelly, a San Pedro librarian and operator of the Book Bike. “You get to meet new people and get to know your community.”

    Kelly has participated in several past CicLAvia events around Los Angeles.

    “CicLAvia actually inspired the Book Bike,” she said, referring to the adult tricycle she modified to carry books in a forward compartment. Kelly rides it to schools and events like CicLAvia, where she distributes free books, signs people up for library cards and gives general information on the Los Angeles Public Library. CicLAvia Executive Director Romel Pascual said the San Pedro Meets Wilmington event is about showing off those communities to visitors and reminding residents what’s in their own backyard.

    “These are great communities and CicLAvia will make them both fun and accessible,” Pascual said. “There will even be pedicabs for seniors.”

    The endpoints of the route are Banning Park in Wilmington and the intersection of 22nd Street and Pacific Avenue in San Pedro, but participants can enter and exit wherever they want. Major streets include Avalon Boulevard, John S. Gibson Boulevard, Harbor Boulevard and Pacific Avenue.
    The route features four hubs — both end points, Wilmington Waterfront Park and a block near the Port of Los Angeles building in Central San Pedro.

    “The hubs have family activities,” Pascual said. “There will be rock climbing, soccer games and food vendors.”

    CicLAvia has drawn a variety of reactions from the community.

    “It gets people thinking about active transportation … [and] reducing our dependence on fossil fuels,” said Sylvia Arredondo, president of the Wilmington Neighborhood Council and Civic Engagement Coordinator for Communities for a Better Environment. “[But] the route passes by the southern end of the [Phillips 66] refinery.”

    Arredondo questions whether that issue will be addressed or if CicLAvia is just going to spotlight the Waterfront.

    “The great thing about CicLAvia is that you get people out in front of your stores,” Jabuka said.

    “But when it gets to San Pedro, the route turns from Harbor Boulevard onto 5th Street to get to Pacific Avenue.”

    Jabuka said that while 5th Street does have quality businesses, it’s not San Pedro’s business center; 6th Street is.

    John Jones III, field deputy for Councilman Joe Buscaino, helped organize the route. He explained that 5th Street was selected because it is widest street around. There will also be lane reductions further south along Harbor Boulevard due to construction work.

    “There will be way-finding signs to point out the businesses on 6th street,” Jones said. “I have been to CicLAvia before. [Riders] do explore the area while in a different part of town to eat and rest.”

    The Downtown San Pedro Business Improvement District will be offering free bus shuttles to parts of Central San Pedro not on the route.

    Jabuka and Kelly are excited that CicLAvia will include Pacific Avenue, allowing riders to see several shops and restaurants that San Pedrans take pride in. The end of the route also makes Cabrillo Beach accessible.

    Since CicLAvia takes place on parts of John S. Gibson and Harbor boulevards, port trucking might be affected. However, Pascual said that the Port of Los Angeles has been very supportive of the event. The Port of Los Angeles helped with route planning and coordinated with Los Angeles Metro to offer bike sharing for participants.

    “Trucks can be a deterrent to riders near the port,” Kelly said. “People will have the opportunity to get up close and personal with the cranes and other port sites.”

    The port is an impressive example of commerce and industry, yet it is also a major source of pollution. There is evidence that CicLAvia benefits communities by reducing local air pollution. As Arredondo mentioned, the more people who are bicycling and walking, the less people that are driving fossil fuel-powered vehicles. A study by the University of California-Los Angeles documented that air particles two-and-a-half micrometers and smaller declined by 49 percent on CicLAvia streets in 2015. These particles can cause cancer and cardiovascular disease as well as impair the nervous system.

    “I look forward to seeing the CicLAvia organizers keep those conversations going [with the community],” Arredondo said.

    The Aug. 13 ride will be the 22nd CicLAvia event. The organizers select a route based on its ability to improve recreation for communities that are low income and park poor. Wilmington and Central San Pedro obviously qualify, prompting some residents to wonder why their towns haven’t hosted CicLAvia before now.

    “It took so long for CicLAvia to get here,” Jabuka said. “San Pedro is like the end of the world in Los Angeles.… Other communities have many great baseball fields, soccer fields, basketball courts, tennis courts…. We need places to play, too. And they need to be free.”
    Jones offered his opinion on why CicLAvia has not been to San Pedro before.

    “There has never been a culture for such an event down here,” Jones said. “CicLAvia is a fairly new concept to Los Angeles and it’s not an easy sale to the community or businesses. Plus, you need to have the political backing for such an event to help get the city departments and grantors like Metro involved.”

    Jabuka offered some context to Jones’ assertion.

    “San Pedro is a hilly town … when you ride down a hill for some groceries, you’re not always going to want to ride back up,” Jabuka said. “Many average riders are discouraged.”

    Yet there is a dedicated group of bicyclists in San Pedro. The Peninsula Cycling Club has about 200 members who enjoy road racing, including Jabuka. They do “Lunch Runs” at the Marina on Wednesdays and Fridays; they also ride along the coast and around the Palos Verdes Peninsula.

    “There is a bike culture here, but it is not the culture the [council office] wants [to promote],” said Arredondo.

    Since 2014, she has worked with a group called C.I.C.L.E (Cyclists Inciting Change through Live Exchange) and occasionally with Jones to put on community bicycle rides and safety workshops; Arredondo even helped put on a class for women to learn how to use a bicycle for self defense.

    Buscaino’s office was willing to promote this community, but only in the context of how his office helped the group.

    “They wanted to do a promo video with us, but our group decided we didn’t want to participate,” Arredondo said. “We were doing things before his office helped us. [After declining,] our events became harder to promote and wouldn’t get prioritized.”

    Pascual offered that CicLAvia has not been to the Los Angeles Harbor before due to another criteria the organizers use to select routes: people from across Los Angeles should be able to use public transit to travel to the event. Prior to 2010, traveling to San Pedro and Wilmington by bus took several hours and often necessitated multiple transfers. However, since the LA Metro Silverline began operating, traveling from Downtown Los Angeles to either community is relatively quick and simple.

    More than 16,000 people commute on the Silverline each day during the week. More than 4,000 people ride it on Sunday — the day of CicLAvia.

    With encouragement from Buscaino and Mayor Eric Garcetti, Pascual made the case to all of CicLAvia’s partners that the city’s public transit system would allow people to get to the Harbor.

    Jabuka stressed that with upcoming waterfront developments, like the Avalon Promenade and San Pedro Public Market, CicLAvia is a unique opportunity for San Pedro and Wilmington to reach out to the rest of Los Angeles.

    “There are so many jewels here, and now they will be showcased to [the rest of] Los Angeles,” Jabuka said.

    If this CicLAvia is like previous ones, there will be participants from 80 percent of the neighborhoods of Los Angeles.

    Kelly added that she hopes visitors will keep tabs on these destinations and projects to visit periodically. She advised locals to welcome visitors.

    “Our own residents have to participate if they want events like CicLAvia to come back,” Kelly said. “So when CicLAvia is here, get off of the sidewalks and [o]nto the street!”

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  • Port Falls Short Again on China Shipping

    • 08/03/2017
    • Paul Rosenberg
    • News
    • Comments are off

    By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

    If representatives of China Shipping are to be believed, their shipping company is the most eco-friendly imaginable, and its partnership with the Port of Los Angeles is a wonder to behold.

    But those forced to live in the shadow of China Shipping have a different view, as was vividly illustrated at the July 19 public comment meeting on the supplemental environmental impact report, or SEIR, for the terminal. This was drafted as a result of the failure to implement a series of measures contained in the original EIR, approved in September 2009.

    “We are proud that this facility is an early leader in environmental measures, such as the adoption of alternative marine power [AMP],” said Matthew Thomas, a lawyer for China Shipping,

    Thomas was echoing Mark Wheeler, general manager of the terminal operator WBCT, who recalled that since 2004, Berth 100 and 102 were the first facilities to use AMP.

    Those claims were even more sweeping.

    “China Shipping holding and COSCO shipping lines company have long been environmental leaders in the shipping industry,” he said.

    Others praised both China Shipping and the port, stressing the need to “balance” business and community concerns.

    But community commentators were not impressed, given that POLA tried to build the terminal without first doing a project EIR only to be sued by local homeowners and environmentalists. This resulted in a settlement of more than $50 million, plus mitigation requirements in the EIR and the strengthening of the Port Community Advisory Committee, or PCAC, as an oversight body. The resulting delay led China Shipping to sue POLA, which resulted in another large settlement. But 11 mitigation measures in the 2009 EIR were never implemented, until exposed in 2015, which is why the SEIR is now being done.

    “There was a lot of discussion in the very beginning here about a balance between the industry and the community, and the reason that we’re talking tonight about these impacts only because of a lawsuit [that came] from the community …that balance was so severely out of whack,” said Janet Gunter, one of three initiating plaintiffs in the suit.

    Peter Warren, a long-time Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council activist and board member, criticized the SEIR’s soft-peddling of the subsequent record during his comments.

    “What really happened was six years of lies and fraud,” Warren said. “The port had agreed to certain mitigation measures, many of the major ones were not implemented. The community — living, breathing adults, disabled people, children, sick people — suffered irreparable harm because of emissions that occurred while the port allowed China Shipping to waive its responsibilities.”

    “In order for the port to intentionally and successfully, I might add, deceive the appellants and the public for so long, it had to involve detailed planning to do so,” said Chuck Hart, president of San Pedro Homeowners United. “Smoke screens and roadblocks had to be put in place to keep us off-guard, white papers produced, clean-air action plans and meetings with neighborhood councils instead of [the Port Community Advisory Committee] — troublesome PCAC, a group of informed citizens that became so knowledgeable about how the port operates they would have to be eliminated because they surely would have discovered and revealed early on in the process of the port’s failure to live up to the terms of the China Shipping agreement.”

    Despite this history, Hart ended on a note of hope.

    “Hopefully, by revealing the port’s maze of deceit regarding this matter, a more honest relationship between the port and the community will result, and justice will prevail in the final chapter of the civic tragedy,” he concluded.

    Warren was more pessimistic.

    “The SEIR contains no mitigation measures or reparations or funds to make whole or make up for the fact that tens of thousands of area residents were irreparably harmed in their health and outdoor activities, because the port willfully violated and engaged in a fraud on the community by violating the court-approved China Shipping settlement,” he said. “There should be reparations and mitigation money.”

    Frank Anderson, Port Committee chairman of the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council, ticked off several highlights from an extensive list developed by his committee.

    “[The] project should meet and exceed the requirements of the San Pedro Bay Clean-Air Action Plan,” he said.

    If needed, these requirements should include off-site mitigation measures, review and application of new technology regulations to ensure the highest level of emission standards, post-project validation of the emission reduction and formal reviews of new emissions control technologies to guide further emission reductions in the future, he said.

    “No one wants this facility to close, but at the same time there are environmental laws that need to be dealt with,” said David Pettit, senior attorney with Natural Resources Defense Council, which argued the original China Shipping case. “The community is looking for some changes over and above the diesel truck system that seems to be what’s indicated in the current draft EIR.”

    Jesse Marquez, founder and executive director of Coalition for a Safe Environment, provided more specific information. Within six months, the coalition’s research identified six zero-emission class VIII truck manufacturers who have zero-emission trucks available.

    “There are four that do tractors, there are 14 near zero, and 11 near zero yard tractors,” he said.

    The zero-emission goal was recently proclaimed by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia. But the SEIR document “is not going to deliver what they claimed,” Gunter said.

    POLA Executive Director Gene Seroka was standing next to the mayors when they made their announcement, Pettit pointed out in a follow-up interview. That was June 12.

    “[On the] Friday of the same week, the China Shipping Supplemental EIR comes out [and] there’s nothing, zero in there in the drayage section the reflecting what the mayor just said,” Petit said. “I just don’t see how you can put out a document that does that.”

    He knows what Seroka may argue, echoing past claims of “infeasibility,” but it won’t stand up under existing law.

    “Using [near-zero] LNG trucks is feasible because there are LNG trucks in the port drayage fleet right now,” Pettit said.

    Other issues in the SEIR such as AMP are distractions, he said.

    “The port claims that it is near 100 percent use now,” he said. “So those are not real issues. The real issue is how fast to transition to zero-emission drayage, as both mayors have promised to do.”

    The comment period has been extended through Sept. 29. NRDC and others are hard at work, developing detailed responses, which, given past experience, will likely end up in court.

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  • Dorian Wood, Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole

    • 08/03/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • Calendar
    • Comments are off

    ENTERTAINMENT

    Aug. 5
    Dorian Wood, Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole
    Dorian Wood awakens a haunting interpretation of Jeannine Deckers’ The Singing Nun and Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole offers a genre-crossing performance from Hawaii.
    Time: 8 p.m. Aug. 5
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Summertime in the LBC
    This summer, enjoy a lineup of talents, including 50 Cent & G-Unit, Yg, Wu-Tang Clan, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony and the George Clinton Parliament Funkadelic.
    Time: 12 p.m. Aug. 5
    Cost: $200
    Details: www.summertimeinthelbc.com
    Venue: The Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    Markus Carlton
    Markus Carlson is a lifelong musician who has worn out many guitars playing gigs, writing and recording over the years. The next chapter in his musical journey will entertain you with new material as well as jazz and blues.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Aug. 5
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 832-0363; www.whaleandale.com
    Venue: The Whale & Ale, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Aug. 6
    Seatbelt, The Paladins
    All the Americana you can handle with plenty of rockabilly, honky-tonk and hillbilly boogie will play at Polliwog Park.
    Time: 5 to 7 p.m. Aug. 6
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/MB-Summer-Concerts
    Venue: Polliwog Park, 1601 Manhattan Beach Blvd., Manhattan Beach

    Aug. 10
    Delgrés
    Witness the Los Angeles debut of a band that brings a bluesy blend of styles from Guadelupe to Louisiana to the Mississippi delta.
    Time:
    8 p.m. Aug. 10
    Cost:
    Free
    Details:
    http://www.skirball.org/programs/sunset-concerts
    Venue:
    Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles

    Aug. 11
    Djs Anthony Valadez, Valida
    Check out the new venue for KCRW’s Summer Nights series, featuring plenty of danceable grooves, games, food and drinks.
    Time: 5:30 p.m. Aug. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://events.kcrw.com/events/summernightsanthonyandvalida
    Venue: Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., Los Angeles

    Septeto Santiaguero
    Get on your feet with one of Cuba’s most influential bands.
    Time: 8 p.m. Aug. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Bill Watrous Quartet
    Bop to straight-ahead jazz, then stuff your face with food from the market.
    Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.farmersmarketla.com/events
    Venue: The Original Farmers Market, 6333 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles

    Dj Nights
    Dance, dance and dance some more.
    Time: 9 p.m. Aug. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://grandparkla.org/calendar
    Venue: Grand Performances, 200 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Aug. 12
    Summer Breeze Festival
    Be part of a night with Keith Sweat, Guy and Teddy Riley, and Bobby Brown.
    Time: 2 to 10 p.m. Aug. 12, and 1 to 9 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: $50 to $160
    Details: www.queenmary.com
    Venue: The Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    Hamed Nikpay
    Enjoy Iranian melodies and dance.
    Time: 8 p.m. Aug. 12
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Aug. 13
    Shari Puorto Band
    Kick back for a bit of blues, rock and soul.
    Time: 5 to 7 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/MB-Summer-Concerts
    Venue: Polliwog Park, 1601 Manhattan Beach Blvd, Manhattan Beach

    Sunday Sessions
    This is a free dance party celebrating Los Angeles’s house music scene, featuring music from Kaleem, Jun and Tony Powell.
    Time: 2 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://grandparkla.org/calendar
    Venue: Grand Park, 200 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Groove Lexicon
    As one of Los Angeles’s most experienced and widely sought-after musicians, David Anderson has appeared, recorded and toured with many popular acts.
    Time: 4 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: $15
    Details: https://alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Aug. 17
    Daymé Arocena
    Experience the jazz-inflected blend of Afro-Cuban soulfulness.
    Time: 8 p.m. Aug. 17
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.skirball.org/calendar/2017-08-17
    Venue: Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles

    THEATER

    Aug. 11
    Macbeth
    Shakespeare by the Sea presents Macbeth. Seduced by supernatural prophecy, Macbeth and his lady embark on an ambitious quest to win the Scottish throne. In the aftermath of their success, we glimpse a world torn apart when a volatile, paranoid tyrant becomes king.
    Time: 7 p.m. Aug. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.citymb.info
    Venue: Polliwog Park, 1601 Manhattan Beach Blvd., Manhattan Beach

    Aug. 12
    Guys and Dolls
    Set in Damon Runyon’s mythical New York City, Guys and Dolls is an oddball romantic comedy. Gambler Nathan Detroit tries to find the cash to set up the biggest craps game in town while the authorities breathe down his neck. Meanwhile, his girlfriend, nightclub performer Adelaide, laments that they’ve been engaged for 14 years.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 12
    Cost: $14 to $24
    Details: lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Aug. 12
    Taming of the Shrew
    Shakespeare by the Sea presents The Taming of the Shrew. When rebellious Katherina stands in the way of her younger sister Bianca’s marriage, fortune hunter Petruchio is enlisted to “tame” the elder daughter, freeing a path for Bianca’s motley suiters. From their first meeting, sparks fly and the ultimate battle of the sexes ensues — leaving us to wonder: who is taming who?
    Time: 7 p.m. Aug. 12
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.citymb.info
    Venue: Polliwog Park, 1601 Manhattan Beach Blvd., Manhattan Beach

    Aug. 13
    Peter y La Loba
    Enjoy another telling of Peter and the Wolf, this time with Latin Grammy Award winners Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam.
    Time: 3 and 4:30 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Aug. 17
    Macbeth
    Shakespeare by the Sea presents Macbeth. Seduced by supernatural prophecy Macbeth and his lady embark on an ambitious quest to win the Scottish throne. In the aftermath of their success, we glimpse a world torn apart when a volatile, paranoid tyrant becomes king.
    Time: 7 p.m. Aug. 17
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.shakespearebythesea.org
    Venue: Terranea Resort, 100 Terranea Way, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Aug. 19
    Cowboy vs. Samurai
    What if the classic romantic comedy, Cyrano de Bergerac, was set in modern-day Wyoming? What if the large-nosed protagonist was now an Asian-American high school English teacher and his love interest was the beautiful new Asian-American teacher with a preference for dating white guys? Will he help his cowboy friend win the girl, or make his own feelings known?
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 19
    Cost: $20
    Details: lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Aug. 27
    Dark Moon
    Elysium Conservatory Theatre roars into the summer with an epic re-imagining of The Ballad of Barbara Allen. Set in the Appalachian Mountains near Ol’ Baldy, Dark of the Moon is an immersive thriller that follows John the Witch Boy and Barbara, a human, as they fight for love among the terrifying worlds of witches and equally colorful residents of Buck Creek.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 7 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 27
    Cost: $10 to $25
    Details: www.fearlessartists.org/box-office-1
    Venue: Elysium Conservatory Theatre, 729 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

    ARTS

    Aug. 19
    Third Saturday Artwalk
    Explore San Pedro’s diverse art scene, featuring 30-plus open galleries, open studios, live music and eclectic dining. Free art walk tour starts at Siren’s coffee house.
    Time: 2 to 6 p.m. Aug. 19
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.SanPedroBID.com
    Venue: Siren’s, 356 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    PVAC Faculty Exhibition
    Showcasing the talent of the community of artists who teach at The Studio School and Youth Studio at Palos Verdes Art Center / Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education, the Faculty Exhibition presents new works in diverse media, including painting, drawing, ceramics, glass, textiles and design.
    Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 19
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://pvartcenter.org/exhibitions/pvac-faculty-exhibition
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 West Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Aug. 25
    Audrey Barrett: Available Light
    Gallery 478 and TransVagrant Projects are pleased to present Audrey Barrett: Available Light, an exhibition of photography and auction benefiting City of Hope Metastatic Breast Cancer Research.
    Audrey Barrett (1940-2017) was an extraordinary photographer and designer whose aesthetic encompassed a broad spectrum from surrealism in photography to Russian constructivism in design. This exhibition consists of black and white gelatin silver and platinum palladium prints from her archive and includes many of the artist’s proofs.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, through Aug. 25
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 732-2150
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Aug. 27
    The Desolation Center Experience
    Before the era of Burning Man, Lollapalooza and Coachella, Desolation Center drew punk and industrial music fans to the far reaches of the Mojave Desert for the first of five events Mojave Exodus in April of 1983. Cornelius Projects pays tribute to Desolation Center’s pioneering vision with an exhibition featuring painting, photography, sculpture, video and ephemera.
    Time: 12 to 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, through Aug. 27
    Cost: Free
    Details: corneliusprojects.com, www.desolationcenter.com
    Venue: Cornelius Project, 1417 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Sept. 3
    Cada Mente en Su Mundo
    The Museum of Latin American Art is proud to host a solo exhibition of new and recent works by Luis Tapia, a pioneering Chicano artist from Santa Fe, New Mexico. For 45 years, Tapia has taken the art of polychrome wood sculpture to new levels of craftsmanship while utilizing it as a medium for social and political commentary.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays, through Sept. 3
    Cost: $7 to $10
    Details: molaa.org
    Venue: MOLAA, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    Sept. 3
    Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray
    In May 1931, photographer Nickolas Muray (1892–1965) traveled to Mexico on vacation where he met Frida Kahlo (19071954), a woman he would never forget. The two started a romance that continued on and off for the next ten years and a friendship that lasted until the end of their lives.
    Time: 11 to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays, through Sept. 3
    Cost: $7 to $10
    Details: molaa.org
    Venue: Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    COMMUNITY

    Aug. 4
    Finding Dory
    The friendly but forgetful blue tang fish, Dory, begins a search for her long-lost parents, and everyone learns a few things about the real meaning of family.
    Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 4
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org
    Venue: Wilmington Waterfront Park, 1004 C. St., Wilmington

    Aug. 5
    Mexican American Baseball and Softball in the South Bay
    Richard A. Santillan, professor emeritus of the Department of Ethnic and Women’s Studies at Cal State Pomona, and Sandra Uribe, history professor at El Camino College, will moderate a panel of leading authors on the history of baseball and softball in the region.
    Time: 1 p.m. Aug. 5
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 603-0088; www.dominguezrancho.org
    Venue: The Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum, 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez

    Aug. 8
    The Whale & Ale Support s Alex’s Lemonade Stand
    Alex’s Lemonade Stand’s mission is to raise money and awareness of childhood cancer causes, primarily for research into new treatments and cures as well as to encourage and empower others, especially children, to get involved and make a difference for children with cancer.
    Reserve a table at The Whale & Ale on Aug. 8 and the restaurant will donate 15 percent of your bill to Alex’s Lemonade Stand.
    Time: Aug. 8
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 832-0363; www.whaleandale.com
    Venue: The Whale & Ale; 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Aug. 10
    Bookmaking Workshop
    Artist Sue Ann Robinson has a six-week residency at the Long Beach Museum of Art. She is dedicating three hours each week during her residency to demonstrate a different bookbinding structure.
    Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 10
    Cost: Free
    Details: lbma.org
    Venue: Long Beach Museum of Art, 2300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

    Aug. 12
    Iowa by the Sea Picnic
    All Iowans and people who love the great state of Iowa are invited to this year’s fun event. The picnic location provides excellent security, adequate space and a great view of the battleship.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 12
    Cost: $12 to $35
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., Berth 87, San Pedro

    Aug. 12
    Alex’s Coast Run
    ILWU Walk the Coast in Los Angeles will host a family-friendly community event. Bring the family for the spectacular ocean-view Alex’s Coast Run 5K, or 1 mile family walk and a 1K Kids’ Run.
    Time: 8:30 a.m. Aug. 12
    Cost: $15 to $35
    Details: www.alexslemonade.org
    Venue: Point Fermin Park, 807 W. Paseo del Mar, San Pedro

    Aug. 13
    CycLAvia SanPedro/Wilmington
    CicLAvia, which produces temporary car-free days that transform streets into safe spaces for thousands of people to explore the city by foot, bike and other forms of non-motorized transport, will take place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 13 in Wilmington and San Pedro.
    No parking will be allowed on the CicLAvia Route from 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 13. Parking restrictions will be enforced and vehicles will be towed beginning at 1 a.m.
    Details: www.ciclavia.org/ciclavia_sanpedro17

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  • La Charanga Cubana

    • 07/27/2017
    • Terelle Jerricks
    • Calendar
    • Comments are off

    ENTERTAINMENT

    July 28
    La Charanga Cubana
    Enjoy traditional Cuban dance music, then stuff your face with food from the market.
    Time: 7 to 9 p.m. July 28
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.farmersmarketla.com
    Venue: The Original Farmers Market, 6333 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles

    July 29
    Mothership Landing
    Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Parliament-Funkadelic’s groundbreaking release.
    Time: 8 p.m. July 29
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 200 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    July 30
    Hard Day’s Night
    You’ll swear The Beatles are in the South Bay.
    Time: 5 to 7 p.m. July 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/MB-Summer-Concerts
    Venue: Polliwog Park, 1601 Manhattan Beach Blvd, Manhattan Beach

    July 30
    Rob Garland’s Eclectic Trio
    Rob Garland’s Eclectic Trio plays original high energy instrumental and vocal music with funk, blues, jazz, fusion and rock.
    Time: 4 p.m. July 30
    Cost: $10
    Details: https://alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St. San Pedro

    Aug. 3
    Ibibio Sound Machine
    Experience African and electronic jams inspired by the golden era of West African funk, disco and post-punk.
    Time: 8 p.m. Aug. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.skirball.org/programs/sunset-concerts/ibibio-sound-machine
    Venue: Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles

    THEATER

    July 29
    Annie 
    Join the irrepressible comic strip heroine as she takes center stage in one of the world’s best-loved musicals. Annie’s escape from an orphanage and the clutches of the wicked Miss Hannigan leads to new life and home with billionaire Oliver Warbucks.
    Time:
     7:30 p.m. July 29, and 2 p.m. July 29 and 30
    Cost: 
    $39 to $60
    Details:
    www.grandvision.org/warner-grand/events.asp
    Venue: 
    Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    July 29
    Dark Moon
    Elysium Conservatory Theatre roars into the summer with an epic re-imagining of The Ballad of Barbara Allen. Set in the Appalachian Mountains near Ol’ Baldy, Dark of the Moon is an immersive thriller that follows John the Witch Boy and Barbara, a human, as they fight for love among the terrifying worlds of witches and equally colorful residents of Buck Creek.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 7 p.m. Sundays July 29 through Aug. 27
    Cost: $10 to $25
    Details: www.fearlessartists.org/box-office-1
    Venue: Elysium Conservatory Theatre, 729 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

    July 30
    Peter & The Wolf
    The childhood classic told with live music.
    Time: 3 to 4:30 p.m. July 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    Aug. 5
    Guys and Dolls
    Set in Damon Runyon’s mythical New York City, Guys and Dolls is an oddball romantic comedy. Gambler Nathan Detroit tries to find the cash to set up the biggest craps game in town while the authorities breathe down his neck. Meanwhile, his girlfriend, nightclub performer Adelaide, laments that they’ve been engaged for 14 years.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 5
    Cost: $14 to $24
    Details: lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Aug. 13
    Peter y La Loba
    Enjoy another telling of Peter and the Wolf, this time with Latin Grammy Award winners Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam.
    Time: 3 and 4:30 p.m. Aug. 13
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.grandperformances.org
    Venue: Grand Performances, 300 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles

    ARTS

    July 30 
    From The Desert to The Sea: The Desolation Center Experience
    Before the era of Burning Man, Lollapalooza and Coachella, Desolation Center drew punk and industrial music fans to the far reaches of the Mojave Desert for the first of five events, Mojave Exodus, in April of 1983. Cornelius Projects pays tribute to Desolation Center’s pioneering vision with an exhibition featuring painting, photography, sculpture, video and ephemera.
    Time: 12 to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays, through July 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 266-9216
    Venue: Cornelius Projects Gallery, 1417 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Aug. 19
    Third Saturday Artwalk
    Explore San Pedro’s diverse art scene, featuring 30-plus open galleries, open studios, live music and eclectic dining.
    Free art walk tour starts at Siren’s coffee house.
    Time: 2 to 6 p.m. Aug. 19
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.SanPedroBID.com
    Venue: Siren’s, 356 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Aug. 19
    PVAC Faculty Exhibition
    Showcasing the talent of the community of artists who teach at The Studio School and Youth Studio at Palos Verdes Art Center / Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education, the Faculty Exhibition presents new works in diverse media, including painting, drawing, ceramics, glass, textiles and design.
    Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 19
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://pvartcenter.org/exhibitions/pvac-faculty-exhibition
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 West Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Aug. 25.
    Audrey Barrett: Available Light
    Gallery 478 and TransVagrant Projects are pleased to present Audrey Barrett: Available Light, an exhibition of photography and auction benefiting City of Hope Metastatic Breast Cancer Research.
    Audrey Barrett (1940-2017) was an extraordinary photographer and designer whose aesthetic encompassed a broad spectrum from surrealism in photography to Russian constructivism in design. This exhibition consists of black and white gelatin silver and platinum palladium prints from her archive including many of the artist’s proofs.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, through Aug. 25
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 732-2150
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Sept. 3
    Cada Mente en Su Mundo
    The Museum of Latin American Art is proud to host a solo exhibition of new and recent works by Luis Tapia, a pioneering Chicano artist from Santa Fe, New Mexico. For 45 years, Tapia has taken the art of polychrome wood sculpture to new levels of craftsmanship while utilizing it as a medium for social and political commentary.
    Time:  11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays, through Sept. 3
    Cost: $7 to $10
    Details: molaa.org
    Venue: MOLAA, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    COMMUNITY

    July 29
    Sinister Circus


    The Queen Mary’s Dark Harbor proudly presents Sinister Circus, the first-ever haunted summer costume ball aboard the Queen Mary. Following a day of macabre fun at Midsummer Scream 2017, join us at a spook-tacular costume party aboard where you can dress up to become one of the ringmaster’s minions for Dark Harbor’s Sinister Circus.
    Time: 8 p.m. July 29
    Cost: $29 to $34
    Details: http://bit.ly/DHSinisterCircus
    Venue: Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    Aug. 12
    Iowa by the Sea Picnic
    All Iowans and people who love the great state of Iowa are invited to this year’s fun event. The picnic location provides excellent security, adequate space and a great view of the battleship.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 12
    Cost: $12 to $35
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., Berth 87, San Pedro

    Aug. 13
    Cyclavia SanPedro/Wilmington
    CicLAvia ,which  produces temporary car-free days that transform streets into safe spaces for thousands of people to explore the city by foot, bike and other forms of non-motorized transport, will take place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 13 in Wilmington and San Pedro.
    No parking will be allowed on the CicLAvia Route from 1 a.m.  to 6 p.m. Aug. 13. Parking restrictions will be enforced and vehicles will be towed beginning at 1 a.m.
    Details: www.ciclavia.org/ciclavia_sanpedro17

    Aug. 18
    Movie Under the Guns
    Battleship Iowa invites you to a free screening of Guardians of the Galaxy. The movie will be shown on board the fantail of Battleship Iowa as you sit under the stars, overlooking the beautiful Los Angeles Waterfront.
    Time: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 18
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro
    Sept. 2
    Swing Pedro Fleet Week 2017
    Come dance, listen to great music and meet great people from San Pedro. This event is free to all Navy and military on active duty so make sure to mingle with our fine servicemen. Spaces fill up quickly so be sure to get your tickets early.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Sept. 2
    Cost: $25
    Details: (310) 547-2348
    Venue: People’s Yoga, Health & Dance, 365 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    13th Annual Light at the Lighthouse Music Festival
    There will be four stages, including a main stage with some of the best headlining Christian rock bands like The Edge and a worship stage featuring talent from local churches.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.lightatthelighthouse.org
    Venue: Point Fermin, 807 W Paseo Del Mar, San Pedro

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  • Residents Invited to Give Input on LBPD

    Residents are encouraged to share their thoughts on how the Long Beach Police Department can better serve their community and meet future policing needs, July 31, at the Long Beach Scottish Rite Center. A second community meeting is scheduled at the Long Beach Community College on August 2.

    Time: 7 to 8:30 p.m. July 31; 7 to 8:30 p.m. Aug. 2
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Long Beach Scottish Rite Center, 855 Elm Ave. Long Beach; Long Beach Community College, Room T-1200, 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach
    Details: (562)570-7555

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  • POLA Expands Emissions Reduction Incentive Grant Program

    • 07/27/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • Briefs
    • Comments are off

    SAN PEDRO – The Port of Los Angeles and other participating Environmental Ship Index incentive providers have expanded their rewards programs for vessel operators willing to go above and beyond regulatory standards to cut harmful emissions from ships.

    The index was developed by the World Ports Climate Initiative,a project of the International Association of Ports and Harbors. Each port customizes its index incentive grants, based on regional and operational drivers. Launched by a collection of Northern European ports in 2011, the index program rewards vessel operators for lowering ship emissions beyond international requirements and in advance of pending regulations. Incentive providers include ports, pilot organizations and other entities. When POLA adopted its index in 2012, it was the first port in North America and the Pacific Rim to join the program.

    Under a new formula that took effect July 1, participating ESI vessel operators are now earning additional incentive points for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from their ships.

    Carbon dioxide is a major source of the heat-trapping greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Ships are a key source of carbon dioxide emissions from port-related operations. Vessel operators participating in the index programs already earn points for reducing nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides, both key components of smog.

    The index program is among the suite of clean air strategies the POLA has implemented to dramatically reduce vessel emissions between 2005 and 2015. For ships alone, overall diesel particulate matter emissions have dropped 87 percent, nitrogen oxide emissions are down 29 percent and sulfur oxide emissions have plummeted 97 percent.

    The index programs use a point system based on fuel purchases, onboard emissions reduction technologies and a ship’s engine rating according to standards established by the International Maritime Organization. The total points determine if a ship qualifies for an incentive grant from a participating port.

    Member ports have moved swiftly to implement the new formula because the index reporting system already collects the necessary performance data from participating vessel operators to assess a ship’s efficiency at sea, and by extension, its carbon dioxide emissions. Reduced carbon dioxide emissions are being calculated by comparing a ship’s fuel consumption and the distance sailed each year for 2013, 2014 and 2015 with the same data for 2016.

    Typically, vessel operators earn points on a per call basis from each port in the index network. Under the new formula, participating operators calling at POLA that have been entering carbon dioxide data and show an improvement over the baseline years could see these additional points boost their scores as early as September.

    At the Port of Los Angeles, a vessel with a score of 50 points or higher earns the operator $2,500 per call, and a score of 40 to 49 is rewarded with $750. In addition to complying with cleaner fuel requirements under the North American Emissions Control Area and the California Air Resources Board and having shore power capability, ships earning 50 points or more typically have engines rated cleaner than organization Tier 2 engine standards and use cleaner fuel than required by regulation and provides carbon dioxidedata. Incentive grants are paid quarterly.

    Additionally at POLA, a ship with a Tier III engine is eligible for a $5,000 incentive per call, and vessels participating in an approved Technology Advancement Program demonstration project are eligible for $750 per call.

    To register with the Environmental Ship Index, visit http://esi.wpci.nl/Public/Home/AboutESI. To participate at the POLA, vessel operators must register online through both the index web portal and the port’s webpage. Registration is free.

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  • Iberian Attitudes Live in Downtown Long Beach

    • 07/26/2017
    • Richard Foss
    • Cuisine
    • Comments are off

    By Richard Foss, Cuisine and Restaurant Writer

    I don’t usually eavesdrop on neighboring diners, but the guy on the cell phone at the next table made it impossible not to. He had the kind of voice that carries across a room. He was doing his level best to get a friend to join him.

    “Hey buddy, I know you’re feeling down right now but you really ought to get out some,” he said. “I’m sitting at a good restaurant with some wine in front of me; you want me to have to drink it alone? And I ordered some food, the plates here are good-sized, and there’s gonna be plenty. Why don’t you come and join me?”

    The accent was pure New York, but the restaurant was Spanish and so was the attitude. The Iberians have great faith in the restorative power of food, wine and companionship. It was charming to hear a champion of the idea in full evangelical mode.

    My wife and I were sitting at an outdoor table at Sevilla in Long Beach, one of a chain of restaurants specializing in Spanish food and paella. We had considered dining inside amid dramatic décor that recalls Dali and Picasso, but the light breeze on the shaded patio was too delightful to resist.

    Every meal here starts with tapas, a category that originated in Spain. In the 1800s these were snacks of cured meats and cheeses that were put on top of bread. When you ordered wine, they were served atop your wine glass, hence their name, which  means “lid” or “cover.” As time went by, they became more substantial and started being served on little plates but were still intended to accompany leisurely meals with many glasses of wine.

    Tortilla Española is delicately served at Sevilla in Long Beach. Photo courtesy of Cafe Sevilla Long Beach

    We started with three fairly traditional items: bacon-wrapped dates stuffed with cabrales blue cheese, octopus and potatoes with garlic and paprika, and a tortilla Española. That last item confuses lots of people who order it and expect some kind of flatbread but get a potato omelette. Both the Mexican and Spanish tortilla are named for their shape, as the word means ‘little cake.’ This one hardly fits that definition as it’s the size and geometry of a generous slice of pie, topped with roasted and pickled bell peppers and mushrooms.  It’s delicious, but almost too much as a starter for two.

    Datiles rellenos are proudly offered at Cafe Sevilla in Long Beach. Photo courtesy of Cafe Sevilla

    The order of dates was daintier, but still substantial: the fruits were skewered and grilled  and then topped with herbs and a sweet and sour glaze. It’s an appetizer that anybody can make at home but few people do, because it’s time-consuming, but it hits all the sweet, salty, fruity and umami buttons.

    The octopus with potatoes was a surprise because my wife actually liked it. She finds most paprika harsh or metallic, and I had ordered this figuring that I’d eat it all. Although there was plenty of paprika, it had an unusually mellow flavor, warm and slightly smoky rather than hot. She usually tries a bite, shudders slightly and moves on to other things, but we shared this equally.

    We had arrived during happy hour, which is arranged differently than usual here.  For every dollar you spend on drinks before 7 p.m., you get a dollar toward food, which is a very generous program. We tried some sangria variations with our starters and wine with dinner, as Spaniards would, and saved a fair amount on our bill.

    For our main course, we shared a small “six sausage” paella, which actually had five sausages and some rabbit medallions if you want to get technical about it. This is a remarkable bargain for a main course because a $24 pan feeds at least two hungry people. Having been to Spain several times, I can say that it tastes just like it’s supposed to. The sausages and rabbit had abundant and varied flavors and the rice cooked in herbed stock was moist and flavorful and just a bit caramelized in the bottom of the pan. They serve six varieties of paella here, including seafood and vegetarian versions. I just may have to come back and try them all.

    We were tempted by the cheese platter but were too full, and might have skipped dessert except that they offered a bread pudding with rum-soaked figs, apricots, cranberry and banana. This particular combination of fruits baked into a cake or custard isn’t traditionally Spanish, but the general idea is and the execution was superb. It had a slightly crisp top and wasn’t overly sweet. The topping of ice cream and drizzle of chocolate were nicely calibrated to match the flavors. It’s one of the best desserts I’ve had in a long time and I taste a lot of desserts.

    The service by a waiter named Rogue was excellent, but there were evidently some problems in coordination with his support staff on the day we were there, as some items arrived late or mistimed. Our experience was very good but the management should watch this aspect of things.

    Our dinner for two ran about $75 with four drinks, which was remarkably reasonable. As we departed, the guy at the table next to us was still hopefully waiting for his buddy to show up. I hope he did, because the experience lightened our moods and might have done the same for him.

    Sevilla is at 140 Pine Ave. in Long Beach.

    Details: (562) 495-1111

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