• Long Beach Women Hotel Workers Rally Against Abuse

    Long Beach Women Hotel Workers Rally Against Abuse

    By Crystal Niebla, Contributing Reporter

    LONG BEACH — More than 70 hotel workers, community activists and their families gathered outside the Long Beach City Hall on June 16 to speak up against poor working conditions in the Long Beach tourism industry.

    “People shouldn’t be overworked, overwhelmed with their duties, especially if they’re being robbed [from] breaks, ” said Martin Rodriguez, who heard about the rally at a Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, a social justice group.

    Workers — mostly women — say they constantly are dealing not only with extreme workloads, but also, sexual harassment at hotels in Long Beach.

    Rosa Casarrubias, a banquet server at the Long Beach Westin Hotel, shared her story.

    “I’ve always remembered when I encountered a drunk guest [dressed] only in a towel,” Casarrubias said. “He kept saying, ‘Come on, honey, come inside to the room.’ Approaching me he asked, ‘What is your name? Where do you live? Do you like to drink? What are you doing after work?’ I was uncomfortable and scared. My heart was racing. I constantly kept looking around to see if anyone could help me, but there was nobody.”

    According to Long Beach Coalition for a Good Job and Healthy Community, a recent international study revealed that 68 percent of sexual assaults go. Casarrubias also said that when workers complain, they are either ignored or disciplined.

    “Many of us are told that it’s not a big deal, but rather, we should have a thicker skin,” she said.

    “I am gravely concerned about the lack of safety that exists in our city’s hotels, especially of the treatment of the hard-working women,” said Elizabeth Castillo, sexual assault forensic nurse specialist,who works at the Long Beach Memorial.

    Castillo said these women also are extremely overworked. In many cases, women are forced to clean without the proper tools and supplies, often on their hands and knees. Some women describe having to pick up hair out of carpet with their hands, she said.

    “Imagine having to clean up to 20 rooms a day — that’s 20 toilets, 20 sinks, 20 floors and 20 bedrooms in only eight hours,” Castillo said. “It’s not humanly possible for one woman to do without a break [and] the rest to go to the bathroom, let alone eat lunch.”

    “I, like many women, can’t even have a restroom break because we have to be on the floor the whole time attending guest orders,” Casarrubias said. “I want to see change.”

     

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  • Suspect, Officer Wounded in Shooting–RL NEWS Breifs June 16, 2015

    Suspect, Officer Wounded in Shooting

    LONG BEACH — The Long Beach Police Department identified a suspect they said was involved in a shooting that wounded an officer on June 14.
    The LBPD identified 31-year-old Eric Arroyo as a suspect in the officer involved shooting.
    The incident took place at about 9 p.m. that day, when police officer were dispatched to an apartment complex on the 3000 block of East Artesia Boulevard. When the police entered the complex, Arroyo exited one of the apartment units and began firing shots at an officer in the courtyard. Three officers returned fire at the suspect. One officer and the suspect both sustained gunshot injuries, officials said.
    Arroyo remains hospitalized. The wounded officer, who remains unidentified, underwent surgery June 15, officials said. Both injuries are considered non-life threatening.
    After learning the suspect had fired a gun within an apartment complex nearby, officers entered the complex to look for victims and evidence.
    When they entered the complex, the suspect exited one of the apartment units and began shooting at an officer in the courtyard. Three officers returned fire at the suspect. Officials said the suspect then left the complex and dropped his weapon, which was later recovered.
    Officers used an electronic control device to take Arroyo into custody. Arroyo resisted arrest. A second officer sustained minor injuries during that altercation, officials said.
    Arroyo was booked for attempted murder of a police officer.
    The case is still being investigated and will be presented to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.
    Anyone with information regarding this incident is urged to call (562) 570-7244 or visit www.LACrimeStoppers.org.

    Tongva Nation Files Public Nuisance Notice Against Plains All American.

    SANTA BARBARA — On June 14, Tongva Ancestral Tribal Nation Administrator John Tommy Rosas filed a public nuisance notice against Plains All American Pipeline.
    The notice was related to a May oil spill in Santa Barbara.
    The letter, written by the Tongva Nation’s legal representative, Anthony Patchett, highlights the mismanagement of Plains operators citing a number of obvious mistakes that have led to dire environmental consequences.
    The letter also makes direct references to the Plains All American Pipeline’s subsidiary, Rancho LPG LLC, in the Los Angeles Harbor Area. This facility has been of grave concern to local residents for more than 40 years due to the voluminous 25 million gallons of highly explosive butane and propane gases and the facility’s close proximity to pre-existing homes and schools.
    The Plains/Rancho 42-year-old liquefied petroleum gas tanks sit within a city documented “Earthquake Rupture Zone” (a convergence of multiple faults) whose magnitude quake potential is 7.3. The millions of gallons of explosive liquefied petroleum gas are stored in tanks built in 1973 to a seismic sub-standard of 5.5 to 6.0. The Plains/Rancho property is designated by the U.S. Geological Survey as “landslide” and “liquefaction” areas.

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  • POLA Container Volumes Edge up Slightly in May — RL NEWS Briefs, June 15, 2015

    POLA Container Volumes Edge up Slightly in May

    SAN PEDRO — May 2015 containerized cargo volumes at the Port of Los Angeles edged up .8 percent compared to the same period last year. The Port handled a total of 694,791 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in May 2015.

    Imports decreased .8 percent, from 351,403 TEUs in May 2014 to 348,427 TEUs in May 2015. Exports declined 3.5 percent, from 158,473 TEUs in May 2014 to 152,917 TEUs in May 2015. Combined, total loaded imports and exports decreased 1.7 percent, from 509,876 TEUs in May 2014 to 501,344 TEUs in May 2015. Factoring in empties, which increased 7.9 percent, overall May 2015 volumes (694,791 TEUs) increased .8 percent.

    For the first five months of 2015, overall volumes (3,181,718 TEUs) are down 4 percent compared to the same period in 2014.

    Data container counts for the POLA may be found at: www.portoflosangeles.org/maritime/stats.asp

    Garcetti Signs Minimum Wage Increase Into Law

    LOS ANGELES — On June 13, Mayor Eric Garcetti signed the City of Los Angeles’s largest anti-poverty measure into law, increasing the city’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020. The law will give a raise to more than 600,000 Angelenos earning minimum wage, helping lift them and their families out of poverty. The Mayor was joined by business, labor, and religious leaders as well as seven members of the Los Angeles City Council to sign the ordinance at

    The law raises the minimum wage to $15.00 by 2020 for businesses with 25 employees or more and to $15.00 by 2021 for businesses with 25 or fewer employees. By 2022, and annually thereafter, the minimum wage will increase based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) for the Los Angeles metropolitan area.
    The minimum wage in Los Angeles will be increased on the following schedule:
    7/1/16: $10.50
    7/1/17: $12
    7/1/18: $13.25
    7/1/19: $14.25
    7/1/20: $15
    For businesses and nonprofits with 25 or fewer employees, the increase will happen on the below schedule:
    7/1/17: $10.50
    7/1/18: $12.
    7/1/19: $13.25
    7/1/20: $14.25
    7/1/21: $15
    Youth wages will be 85 percent of the minimum wage for workers 14 to 17 years old.
    Of the more than 600,000 minimum wage earners who will receive a raise, 97 percent of those workers are aged 20 and older; 60 percent are older than 30 years old. More than 80 percent of the workers receiving this raise will be people of color and 50 percent are women. Almost half of minimum wage earners earning this wage have some college education and 14 percent have a bachelor’s degree or higher.
    In addition to the minimum wage, Garcetti will sign into law an ordinance passed by the Los Angeles City Council that will establish an Office of Labor Standards, with $500,000 budgeted in fiscal year 2015-2016 to fund investigators and outreach efforts to ensure businesses are paying workers their fair share. The office will work to curtail wage theft and ensure a level playing field for businesses in Los Angeles, working in conjunction with state efforts to enforce the minimum wage.

     

    Garcetti Announces New Deputy Mayor

    LOS ANGELES — On June 12, Mayor Eric Garcetti appointed Jeff Gorell as his new deputy mayor for Homeland Security and Public Safety, effective July 6, 2015.

    Gorell is a former California State legislator who also served as a military intelligence officer and a deputy district attorney.

    As deputy mayor for Homeland Security and Public Safety, Gorell will advise the mayor on policy related to and oversee the departments of police, fire, and emergency management, and he will also coordinate with other regional, state, and federal agencies to ensure Los Angeles is safe and fully prepared for any emergency.

    Gorell was a member of the California State Assembly, representing the 37th and 44th District, from 2010 to 2014. Previously, he was a deputy district attorney in Ventura County, serving in the Major Narcotics and Serious and Violent Felony Units. Gorell is also a commander in the U.S. Navy Reserve and was deployed twice to Afghanistan, in 2001-2002 and 2011-2012.

    Gorell earned his bachelor of arts degree in history from the University of California, Davis and his juris doctorate from University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law. He lives in Camarillo with his wife Laura and their three children.

     

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  • Time Slips A Cog

    By Lionel Rolfe

    I’m beginning this piece by chipping away at a giant writer’s block.

    That big ugly monolith plunked itself down in front of me the other day when the boyfriend of my ex-wife discovered I was still texting and phoning and even meeting her for nice dinners on rare occasions. She didn’t even tell me in person. She texted me that she was cutting me off. I even think that was the word she used. I was indeed cut.

    Suddenly, all the insights I thought I had gained during my seven decades on this earth slipped away. My ability, even my desire to write disappeared. A river of mundanity flooded my floundering ship. In that mood, I walked down to the corner liquor store for a friend of mine who wanted a small bottle of scotch. I peered down at the sidewalk which I check out much more carefully nowadays because of my age. I didn’t want to slip and fall.

    It’s been more than half a century since I was a student at Los Angeles City College and lived in the Echo Park and Silver Lake area. I wouldn’t have thought about it further, except for a great universal fart that occurred, tearing me loose from my moorings. Something was missing. It took me a moment to realize what was missing was the majority of my life. The blinding revelation came right after I had missed a particularly large hole in the sidewalk and avoided stumbling and falling. I realized too I had never really left the old hood. It was as if I had never gone to the Thracian Valley or the Black Sea coast or London or Canada or Baja California or Jerusalem or Melbourne. Whatever wisdom I gained on those voyages was no longer a part of me. I had simply never left here.

    When I was a student living in Echo Park, I knew I would devote my life to making the world a better place. I was excited by the things that could be. My earliest mentor in all this had been Jacque Fresco, a futurist who is nearly 100 years old today, and at last word was still living in Florida where he’s yet building the city of the future. In those days he had his laboratory on Riverside Drive, a bit south of Los Feliz Boulevard, closer to Toontown than Silver Lake.

    Jacque excited me about the future, but that’s when I wasn’t even a teenager. Now, at a venerable age, I’m struck hardest by the reality of the fact that today’s sidewalks are the same aged, buckling, piss-ridden thoroughfares they had always been even though the stores are all fo-foo and wildly trendy. Still, I think it’s a fair question to ask–if the sidewalks have grown so much worse in 50 years, how can we talk about any future?

    Some of the catalyst behind the slipping cog may have simply been that it was summer — never my favorite time in the ol’ hood. The sun that falls in Los Angeles in the summer is hot, smoggy, intense, profoundly dreary and intensely mundane. It is flat, with no spring or autumn sparkle.

    And I now have to closely watch where I put my foot so I won’t take a fall from an unexpected fissure created by a protruding tree through the sidewalk.

    As I said, I nearly fell. I was happy I hadn’t. But I also realized that It was probably inevitable that one day I will fall on these mundane and dreary sidewalks and die there.

    It was a big deal when I left the old neighborhood. I was 19, and my pregnant wife and I moved to Pismo Beach, a couple of hundred miles up on the coast, so I could take a newspaper job. The world travels would come much later, for I intended to tell the various tales that seemed so important to tell. Now I’m probably done traveling. And I’m home, still walking the stifling hot summer streets of the old neighborhood. I’m seeing the same old sidewalks and streets, and I no longer believe we can make this a better earth. We only seem to be able to make it worse. I’m sorry to be so sour but the facts leave me no choice.

    I so badly want to make sense of it all. Where did the years go? What the hell was it all about? Very soon after that fateful trip to the liquor store, I needed someone to talk to. I have interviewed many brilliant people over the years, even some great ones — politicians, philosophers, scientists, musicians and the like. I guess it would be interesting to take a trip to Florida to see what my old mentor Jacque Fresco is doing and saying. But I am afraid even if I could go, it would be a disappointment. I’m afraid even if I could somehow sit down in a room with some of my heroes like Mark Twain or Jack London or Beethoven, I would come away disappointed. People are nothing if not human, and that’s a problem.

    So, I’ll go hang out with a friend who lives in Angelino Heights, one of the oldest residential areas close to downtown. His name is John Owen. He used to be a pretty important bureaucrat in Los Angeles City Hall. He’s a somewhat philosophical fellow. He had a droll way of telling stories of how corruption works in city hall. He also was a dedicated fighter of nuclear weapons and the like, going to jail for his pacifism many times. These days his activism is mostly relegated to helping the homeless as best he can. He’s aligned, at least politically and spiritually, with what’s left of the old Dorothy Day Catholic Worker movement. His two life-partners died on him. He’s resigned to that. He says he’s entirely asexual these days. He’s created a wondrous back yard for himself and his friends. It is full of odd trees and bushes he brought in over the years. The place looks like a jungle, yet, it’s little more than stone’s throw from downtown. It’s a surrealistic perch even in Los Angeles, which has a number of wonderfully surrealistic perches hidden in various corners here and there.

    I confess my doubts and fears to him. He introduces me to a friend, Barry Qualls, who describes himself as a songster from Lincoln Heights.  Barry has spent his whole life seeking stardom in rock ‘n’ roll, and apparently never quite made it. But it’s all good to him. Each day he wakes up is a blessing.

    When John does his version of waxing rhapsodically he talks about how “the body of man puts out more light than it takes in,” which is what stars do. He concludes we already are stars.

    Owen came to his view because “there was an event in my life. I lost my mind. I was in the process of losing my mind, and then it happened,” he says happily–and not really looking to me like he really had lost his mind.

    From that event he came to realize that “Everything is connected, it’s far more beautiful than we can tell. Everything is a star, everything is shining and we are the viewing station of the planet. Our consciousness is the consciousness of the plant. This whole earth is one animal, one organism. But then, I always get I was never born and hence cannot die. And that’s the way it is.”

    Was this something like what had happened to me?

    Sounds kind of like hippie babble, I say to him, but not in an unfriendly way. So, dear reader, do you have a better answer? I’d still be happier if my ex-came home, but knowing that isn’t going to happen, I’ll just go with the flow, man.

    I am from LA, after all.

     

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  • Homelessness Increases in Harbor Area, County

    By Ivan Adame, Contributing Reporter

    New data produced from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority shows homelessness in the South Bay Harbor Area increased 39 percent since 2013.

    Since the prior count, in 2013, volunteers counted 838 new homeless people in the South Bay Harbor Area, totaling to 3,006. Service Planning Area 8, the South Bay Harbor Area, includes San Pedro, Wilmington, Lomita, Carson, Torrance, Rancho Palos Verdes, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Gardena, El Segundo, parts of Hawthorne, Lakewood,  Lennox and Inglewood.

    The Los Angeles  Homeless Services Authority considers different categories of homeless people, among these categories are: chronically homeless people, chronically homeless family members, people who have substance abuse issues, severely mentally ill people, veterans, domestic violence survivors, people living with HIV/AIDS and people who have some sort physical disability or challenge.

    The homeless count results showed significant increases in most classifications of homelessness. The largest group of homeless people impacted are chronically homeless people. Their numbers have almost tripled at 1,122, up from 409 two years ago. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development defines chronic homelessness as an individual or family with a disabling condition who has been continuously homeless for a year or more or has had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years.

    The numbers of homeless people who have experienced domestic violence have tripled, from 187 to 584. Veteran homelessness has doubled, from 238 to 575. Also, the amount of homeless people who have issues with substance abuse have increased from 680 to 1,084.

    Overall, the new data shows that the Los Angeles County has experienced a 16 percent increase since 2013, with 5,650 new homeless people, totaling to 41,175.

    One of the most notable changes in homelessness across the county includes a significant increase in the use of tents, makeshift shelters and vehicles, up 85 percent from 2013. There was also a 12 percent increase in family homelessness.

    The Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count, which took place in late January, was an effort of 5,500 volunteers across 108 deployment sites around much of the county.  Glendale, Long Beach, and Pasadena did not participate because those cities produced their own counts.

    Details: http://tinyurl.com/homelessscount2015

     

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  • Any Given Sunday

    UCO Comes Through for Long Beach Homeless

    By Arlo Tinsman-Kongshaug, Editorial Intern

    Urban Community Outreach may not be a large nonprofit, but what they do is not small.

    The Long Beach organization has been helping to stem homelessness and poverty since 2008. Not only does it feed and clothe thousands of people, but it has also succeeds in providing a safe and comfortable environment for homeless people. Every Sunday it opens its doors of its drop-in center in downtown.

    Its mission statement is simple: “To advance the interests and promote the welfare of children, the economically disadvantaged and homeless people in the downtown Long Beach area.”

    The drop-in center, founded by Janet Rhodes, was originally part of the First Congregational Church of Long Beach, a progressive church that has been making efforts to help Long Beach’s homeless community. It was established after people began to realize that the homeless had no place to go on Sundays. Most agencies are closed that day. They began to open up their church to the homeless on Sundays, giving them a place to escape the weather and relax.

    In time, the drop-in center began to increase its scale and services and attracted more volunteers, including college students and AmeriCorps members. In 2008, the center had grown large enough to become a nonprofit organization separate from the church. Thus, Urban Community Outreach was born.

    Today, the nonprofit continues to run the center. Many of Urban Community Outreach’s volunteers and board members are also members of the church.

    The center’s doors open from 12:30 to 4 p.m. Sundays, except the first weekend of December and all Sundays in July. Two hot and nutritious meals are served, one when the doors open and one at 2 p.m. It’s computer lab has 16 computers that people can use to send emails, browse the Internet, or other activities like writing. Computer skills are also taught to broaden patrons’ job opportunities. A nurse visits the center once a month for treatment and counseling, and dental care is offered sporadically.

    UCO Executive Director Arlene Mercer, also founder of Food Finders, said by the end of 2015, the organization hopes to have dental services scheduled monthly.

    Additionally, the center distributes camping supplies to people living on the streets, including tents and sleeping bags, hygiene kits, books, food for pets they may have, canned goods, toilet paper and backpacks.

    “We are one of the few organizations that give completely free services like these,” Mercer said.

    The drop-in center at the First Congregational Church of Long Beach, also known as Patterson Hall, is at 241 Cedar Ave. in Long Beach

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  • Cheryl Green Center Re-opens

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  • Hilton Unofficial Winner of Special Election

    Decisions on Council Vacancies Delayed

    By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

    The unofficial election returns show Jawane Hilton, pastor of City on the Hill Church, has won the Carson City Council seat left vacant when Mike Gipson was elected to the state assembly.

    To fill the vacancy, the city hosted a special election on June 2, with six candidates on the ballot. However, the margin of votes between Hilton and second-place finisher Jesus Alex Cainglet was close.

    The city clerk is delaying the certification of the election and will announce the date of when the winner will be sworn in. Some provisional ballots still need to be counted. The clerk’s office made no further comment on the reason for the delay and the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder also refused to comment on why a count of provisional ballots might be subject to delay.

    Special Election Results

    The city clerk’s office gave this unofficial tally:

    • Jawane Hilton, 2135 votes, 36.7 percent

    • Jesus Alex Cainglet, 1994 votes, 34.2 percent

    • Rita Boggs, 799 votes, 13.7 percent

    • Stephen John Randle, 356 votes, 6.1 percent

    • Emanuel Chuma Obiora, 320 votes, 5.5 percent

    • Joseph Gordon, 221 votes, 3.8 percent

    Candidates’ Support and Finances

    Although Carson council elections are nonpartisan, Hilton received support from many Democratic leaders including Assemblyman Mike Gipson, Rep. Janice Hahn, Sen. Isadore Hall III and Council member Lula Davis-Holmes. His campaign was highly visible, well-financed and relied heavily on mailings and phone banks in the days immediately before the election.

    Campaign financial records show that labor organizations, along with two Democratic candidates’ organizations, supported Hilton, while mostly ignoring other candidates. Gipson for Assembly 2016 donated $10,000 and Steven Bradford for Senate 2016 contributed $1,500. Various labor organizations contributed a combined $6,000. In addition, Watson Land kicked in $2,500.

    Cainglet, the candidate with the second-best funding, also got $2,500 from Watson Land. However, the region’s Democratic leadership ignored him. The remaining candidates were self-funded or operated with much smaller contributions from individuals.

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  • THE 29TH ANNUAL LONG BEACH BAYOU FESTIVAL

    By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

    The Long Beach Bayou Festival is like a big’ole picnic with live music and line dancing. Between the authentic Cajun and Creole cuisine and the top notch blues, zydeco and Cajun artists on two stages, it’s hard tell which the greater draw is.

    This year, Grammy-nominated bands Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys and the Geno Delafose & French Rockin’ Boogie are performing.

    Also in the lineup is Grammy-winner Joel Savoy and Cajun-Hall-of-Famer, Jesse Legé backed by the band Cajun Country Revival,

    On the blues stage, the multiple award-winning Zac Harmon will hook up with the Stony B Blues Band. Harmon has crafted songs for the O’Jays, The Whispers and Karyn Hill, before returning to his blues roots in 2002.

    Stony B has played behind such legends as Buddy Guy, James Cotton, Junior Wells, Koko Taylor and others.

    Corney Mim’s band The Knowitallz will also be there. Their famed bass player and leader has played with the likes of Michael Jackson, Beyonce, Natalie Cole, Snoop Dogg, George Michael and several others. Mims will bring Barbara Morrison & Rodz Kids from the Roderick D. Jones Foundation to the stage.

    Also on the blues lineup: soulful blues-rock singer Tracy Niles Seville, blues and jazz singer Charlie Jené and the finger poppin’ picking style of blues guitarist Bernie Pearl.

    Each day of the Bayou Festival, a costumed Mardi Gras parade will be led by the New Orleans Traditional Jazz Band.

    As for the food, a colorful French Quarter marketplace will be complete with gumbo, crawfish étouffée, jambalaya, hush puppies and other Cajun and Creole delicacies. As for desserts, there will be loads of sweet potato pie, beignets and an array of cobblers for as far as the eye can see.

    And, if you think you’re a champion eater, sign up for the popular crawfish and watermelon eating contests for a prize.

    The children aren’t forgotten. The festival’s Kids’ Corner will have extensive children’s activities including costume, masks and umbrella making for the Mardi Gras Parade and other arts and crafts. There will also be storytelling, magic demonstrations, sing-a-longs, and other shows.

    SCHEDULE

    FULL CHILDREN’S STAGE SCHEDULE

    11 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 20

    Bayou Kids Fun Stage

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    GATES OPEN

    11 a.m. to 9 p.m. June 20

    Main Gate

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    BERNIE PEARL

    12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

    The blues is life itself to Bernie Pearl. A guitarist with an upbeat, finger-poppin’ picking style he learned at the elbows of blues masters Sam ‘Lightnin’ Hopkins, Mance Lipscomb, Mississippi Fred MacDowell, and others. Yet, Bernie Pearl is no hidebound traditionalist. As music critics and aficionados have said for years, he is a craftsman who packs his songs with melodic interpretations that are new and personal each time he picks up his vintage Martin or National. To hear him tell it…

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    FULL BLUES STAGE SCHEDULE

    12 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

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    DAVID SOUSA & THE ZYDECO MUDBUGS

    12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

    Since 1998, the Zydeco Mudbugs have been bringing the heat of Louisiana Zydeco music to the festivals, dance halls, clubs and parties all over So Cal and beyond. The Zydeco Mudbugs play authentic Zydeco, using the Cajun single row and triple row diatonic accordions, and with songs in Louisiana French and English. The Zydeco Mudbugs music features the best of Zydeco from the early Zydeco pioneers Boozoo Chavis and Clifton Chenier, up to the modern innovators such as Beau Jocque…

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    FULL ZYDECO STAGE SCHEDULE

    12 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

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    DANCE LESSON

    1:20 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

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    STONEY B BLUES BAND

    1:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

    Stoney B is the real deal, a true Blues Man. He was born in Chicago. He grew up listening to his father, Lil’ Howlin’ Wolf, playing the Blues and his dad learnt his Blues from the Chicago Blues Legend, Howling Wolf. During Stoney B’s career he has played behind well-known Blues Musicians such as Buddy Guy, James Cotton, Junior Wells, Koko Taylor, Johnny Guitar Embry and the Blues Kings, Son Thomas, Homesick James, Lovie Lee, Roosevelt Boobie Barnes and Willie…

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    T-LOU & HIS SUPER HOT ZYDECO BAND

    1:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

    A leading light of the Los Angeles Zydeco scene, singer and accordionist T-Lou was born Louis Joseph Eaglin in Grand Coteau, LA; the son of sharecroppers, he taught himself guitar at the age of 15 and later played bass in a high school rhythm and blues combo. Upon graduating high school, he relocated to Houston before settling in California; there T-Lou attended a Clifton Chenier concert and fell under Zydeco’s sway, soon learning accordion and forming the Los Angeles Zydeco Band. After issuing 1985’s T-Lou & His Los Angeles…

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    DANCE LESSON

    3:05 p.m. to 3:25 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

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    CHARLIE JENE’

    3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

    Charlie grew up in Long Beach, CA and began singing at the early age of three. Her mother also had a beautiful voice & sang as a solo artist in the church. Charlie followed in her mother’s footsteps also as a solo artist. Charlie lost her sight in 1969, and moved to Cleveland, Ohio there she began her professional singing career in the early 70’s. She became the first blind jazz and blues singer in that region. Charlie met and…

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    JOEL SAVOY, JESSE LÉGE & THE CAJUN COUNTRY REVIVAL

    3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

    Joel Savoy is one of the most highly regarded Cajun musicians in Southwest Louisiana today. A GRAMMY winner for his production work with The Band Courtbouillon and a nine-time GRAMMY nominee, as well as a two-time winner of the coveted CFMA Fiddler of the Year Award, Joel represents his culture with an authority that few people his age can and his playing leaves no doubt that Cajun music is still very much alive. He has worked and played with the stars, including John Fogerty, Linda…

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    Corney Mims & The kNOW-IT-ALLz with special guests: Barbara Morrison and The Roderick D. Jones Foundation (Rodz Kids)

    5:15 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

    Cornelius “Corney” Mims is regarded as one of L.A.’s truly “elite” bass players and band leaders. As a producer, songwriter, musician and musical director he has performed live, in studio, and on television with well-known artists throughout the music industry. His list of credits reads like a who’s who of the music industry’s “A-List”.  Names like Michael Jackson, Beyonce, Mary J. Blige, LL Cool J, Smokey Robinson, Brandy, Phil Collins, Snoop Dogg and Natalie Cole only scratch the surface of his musical accomplishments.

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    CHUBBY CARRIER AND THE BAYOU SWAMP BAND

    5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

    “Ain’t no party like a Chubby party!” If you haven’t experienced the high energy, swamp funky zydeco sound of Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band, it is high time that you join the legions of fans that have. Once the accordion-playing virtuoso grabs the mic and takes to the stage with his band mates, audiences are treated to a show like no other. Chubby’s sound is infectious – a concoction of blues, 70s funk, rock and roll, and good-ole…

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    DANCE LESSON

    7:05 p.m. to 7:25 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

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    STEVE RILEY AND THE MAMOU PLAYBOYS

    7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 20

    Zydeco Stage

    The band is called Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys. The guy in the middle holds a button-box that squeezes like an accordion, but shouts hallelujah like a big brass band. The fiddle cracks wise and warm, the guitar falls off the edge of the earth, and the rhythm section is purring rumble like a Coupe DeVille of shark-fin vintage. It all flows as a liquid-smooth groove, topped with three heartfelt voices harmonizing in 17th-century French from the steamy sub-tropics.…

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    SEVILLE

    7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. June 20

    Blues Stage

    Unions that last 39 years are truly special. 39 years of sharing the joy of music is exceptional. Celebrating this unusual achievement is music history. Seville continues as strong now as in the beginning, 1975. Philemon Young Jr JB. Williams Jr, Larry Tate, Tony Williams and Michael Martin Sr. came together in 1975 as “Seville”.  Seville’s first sold out performance was 1979 at Dooto’s Music Center in Compton Ca.. It drew a crowd of over 1500 guests. “Seville’s first record was…

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    FULL CHILDREN’S STAGE SCHEDULE

    11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. June 21

    Bayou Kids Fun Stage

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    GATES OPEN

    11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. June 21

    Main Gate

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    BONNE MUSIQUE ZYDECO

    12 p.m. to 1 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

    Bonne Musique Zydeco (BMZ), literally “good zydeco music,” is a 6-member band specializing in the Creole music of Louisiana and east Texas. BMZ draws upon the style of traditional Cajun and Creole musicians, and the influences of the blues and New Orleans artists of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s to create a blend of music designed for dancing. Bervick J. Deculus, a native of Louisiana, bass player and leader of BMZ, founded the band in 1991. He is carrying on…

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    BILL MAGEE BLUES BAND

    12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

    Voted the Best Blues Band in San Diego by the San Diego Music Association and Reader Magazine; one of the most sought after local bands in the city. He has also been featured in numerous newspaper, radio and television interviews. Since his first CD, “Steppin’ Out”, he has just been tearin’ up the San Diego Blues Scene. His album “Low Down Dirty Blues” has received rave reviews in several publications such as “Blue Ink”. His latest work entitled “Good Morning…

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    FULL BLUES STAGE SCHEDULE

    12 p.m. to 7 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

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    FULL ZYDECO STAGE SCHEDULE

    June 21 at 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.

    Zydeco Stage

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    DANCE LESSON

    1:05 p.m. to 1:25 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

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    DANCE LESSON

    1:20 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

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    STEVE RILEY AND THE MAMOU PLAYBOYS

    1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

    The band is called Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys. The guy in the middle holds a button-box that squeezes like an accordion, but shouts hallelujah like a big brass band. The fiddle cracks wise and warm, the guitar falls off the edge of the earth, and the rhythm section is purring rumble like a Coupe DeVille of shark-fin vintage. It all flows as a liquid-smooth groove, topped with three heartfelt voices harmonizing in 17th-century French from the steamy sub-tropics.…

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    TRACY NILES

    1:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

    TRACY NILES is a brilliant song-writer, soulful blues-rock singer and an engaging performer who sings her original songs from her heart ranging from “guttural growls to falsetto highs.”  She catches every audience’s attention immediately!  Judges agreed at the 13th Annual L.A. Music Awards where she won “Female Vocalist of the Year” and performed her song “You’re My Way Home” with her Taylor guitar and a 20-piece orchestra. Niles’ new album is long overdue.  The clever title track “One Step Ahead”, should be renamed “One GIANT…

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    DANCE LESSON

    June 21 at 3:05 p.m. to 3:25 p.m.

    Blues Stage

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    CAFÉ R&B

    3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

    CAFÉ R&B, featuring Vocalist Roach, and her guitar-slinging husband Byl Carruthers, has been wowing audiences throughout the U.S. and Europe for 15 years. They have released 4 Critically acclaimed Albums, including their most recent: “American Music” They are considered one of the most exciting live acts in the Blues, and beyond. The CAFÉ R&B sound is firmly rooted in electric Blues, but theirs is a tapestry of Blues, Rock, Jazz, R&B, and Americana.   Past Performances Include: Chicago Blues Festival…

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    CHUBBY CARRIER AND THE BAYOU SWAMP BAND

    3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

    “Ain’t no party like a Chubby party!” If you haven’t experienced the high energy, swamp funky zydeco sound of Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band, it is high time that you join the legions of fans that have. Once the accordion-playing virtuoso grabs the mic and takes to the stage with his band mates, audiences are treated to a show like no other. Chubby’s sound is infectious – a concoction of blues, 70s funk, rock and roll, and good-ole…

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    DANCE LESSON

    4:50 p.m. to 5:10 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

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    DANCE LESSON

    5:05 p.m. to 5:25 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

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    ZAC HARMON

    5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. June 21

    Blues Stage

    Born and raised in the heart of Jackson, Mississippi, Zac Harmon is a true disciple of the music that emanated from the city’s historic Farish Street district, universally recognized as the home of such great blues legends like the late, great Elmore James. While in high school and college, Harmon gigged as a guitarist for the likes of Z.Z. Hill, Dorothy Moore and Sam Myers. Relocating to L.A. in the early eighties, he worked as a studio musician and then…

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    GENO DELAFOSE

    5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. June 21

    Zydeco Stage

    Geno Delafose (born February 6, 1971 in Eunice, Louisiana) is a zydeco accordionist and singer. He is one of the younger generations of the genre who has created the sound known as the nouveau zydeco. His sound is deeply rooted in traditional Creole music with strong influences from Cajun music and also country and western. His father is the famous zydeco accordion player John Delafose. Delafose was born and raised in Eunice, Louisiana. At the age of eight, he joined his father’s band,…

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  • The Status-Shaming and Criminalization of Homeless People

    By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

    On May 28, Random Lengths News followed up on a tip that homeless people were regularly being refused access to the public restrooms at the Anderson Park Senior Citizen’s Center on 9th and Mesa streets.

    On that day, we asked a man pushing a shopping cart near the center if he was allowed to use the bathroom there. It turned out he didn’t know the facility has restrooms.

    The man then parked his cart filled with blankets and boxes, and went inside. He asked the first person he saw in an administrative office about the restrooms.

    “I’m sorry, sir. The restrooms are out of order,” a silver-haired lady politely replied.

    The restrooms were only a few paces beyond the administrative offices and there was no sign indicating they were out of order.

    The park’s site manager, Art Jackson, told Random Lengths that he couldn’t speak to the press without permission from his supervisor, Serena Fiss-Ward.

    Fiss-Ward ultimately directed Random Lengths’ questions further up the bureaucratic food chain to the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Park’s director of public information.

    Rose Watson, the spokeswoman for the department, had not responded by presstime.

    Among the questions sent to the department:

    • How has Los Angeles Recreation and Parks staff been coping with complaints with homeless people on park grounds?

    • Is there an official policy that prohibits homeless people from using the restrooms at Anderson Senior Center?

    • How was the community notified about the formation of a park advisory board?

    Homeless_DoorLater, staff posted a notice that the restrooms were only for patrons of the senior center, though the word “patron” was left open for interpretation.

    This past April, the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council asked the department to form a park advisory board for Anderson Park. The application period ends June 30.

    On June 3, Random Lengths News asked Jackson about the application. He responded that it already closed.

    Recreation and Parks staff ultimately determines the board makeup after an applicant passes all fingerprinting and background checks. Applicants also must be stakeholders in the community of a park.

    At a June 9 Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council meeting, a Recreation and Parks official, Craig Raines, noted that department staff members aren’t required to explain their decisions, but would do so if asked.

    The stream of anecdotal reports on staff attitudes toward the homeless and their use of public facilities worries homeless advocates, like Karen Ceaser, a member of the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council.

    “One gentleman who was homeless told me that…he used to go in there to charge his phone. He has since found housing, but a few weeks ago he sat down [in the center] and started charging his phone. The new director told him, ‘Get your stuff and get out here. You can’t be here.’ And, that’s how they’re treated,” she said.

    Ceaser,   speaking only for herself in the context of this story, said that the gentleman didn’t look like a homeless person.

    In many ways, the increasing amount of status-shaming of homeless people on social media aims to accomplish what local legislation can’t officially do: force homeless people out of town rather than solving the problem of homelessness.

    Social media chatter on homeless people has intensified in recent months as more homeless people have become increasingly more visible.

    This past May, Gerald Robinson and his comrades were livid after they were apparently forced to move from the park en masse one morning.

    Many in this group were expelled from the encampments at Plaza Park, Antes Restaurant and the Beacon Street Post Office by the Los Angeles Police Department and the Bureau of Street Services this past April.

    “I got two sides. They won’t like my bad side,” Robinson fumed. Stories abound of residents filming and taking pictures of homeless people and posting them on Facebook neighborhood watch pages.

    “I was here when boats were still ferrying people to Terminal Island,” said Robinson, a local San Pedran.

    Robinson was one of those featured in the Random Lengths story about the encampments in front of the closed Antes Restaurant this past April.

    Encampment residents were frequently ticketed at the park before signs prohibiting camping at the Plaza Park were put up, due to local outcries on Facebook.

    The UC Berkeley School of Law released a policy paper this past February that highlighted the growing number of anti-homeless laws in California. In Los Angeles alone, only 22 percent of homeless people had a shelter bed in 2013. That number grew to 30 percent in 2015, leaving nearly three-quarters of homeless people in Los Angeles County living outside full time.

    The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals struck down Los Angeles municipal law that prohibited sitting, lying or sleeping in public places, saying it violated homeless people’s Eighth Amendment right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment.

    “When laws prohibiting sleeping or camping in public become an enforcement priority, the resulting arrest campaigns may restrict the right of homeless people to move freely,” the Berkeley report noted

    In November 2014, the Los Angeles City Council asked the city attorney’s office to draft an ordinance that would make it easier and faster for city workers to clean up and impound the belongings of homeless people.

    The proposal would reduce the time required to post notice requiring removal of bulky items from sidewalks from 72 to 24 hours.

    The belongings of homeless people that can fit into 60-gallon drums are taken to a facility in downtown Los Angeles and held for about 90 days or until retrieved by the owners. Depending on where the items were collected, those belongings are as good as gone. Sometimes they include documents needed to get into housing.

    That’s what happened to Robinson when his encampment was cleared in April. A day before the cleanup, Robinson had to be hospitalized for shortness of breath and other issues. He was released three days later.

    Fortunately, despite his belongings being taken 26 miles away, he has received his Section 8 housing voucher and is close to finding housing.

    Meanwhile, there are local efforts underway by homeless advocates to provide transitional housing for those with Section 8 vouchers looking for permanent housing.

     

     

     

     

     

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