• THE STINKY CHEESE MAN @ the Garage Theatre

    To appreciate the Garage Theatre’s production of John Glore’s The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales, you probably need to meet at least one of two preconditions: 1) a love of Looney Tunes-style humor, and 2) fond remembrance of the John Scieszka/Lane Smith Caldecott-winning children’s book from which the play is drawn. I’d never heard of the book, and even as a kid I didn’t find Bugs Bunny and pals especially funny (despite watching them for God knows how many hours), so digest this review cum that particular grano salis.

    The Stinky Cheese Man is an exceedingly simple work, consisting of little more than the slightly twisted retelling of several classic fairy tales (the Ugly Duckling, the Princess and the Pea, etc.). A minor bit of metafiction casts Jack (he of the big beanstalk; played by Craig Johnson) as narrator, and several fairy-tale characters make cameos in others’ tales (such as when Rumpelstiltskin finds his way into Cinderella’s world).

    Paging through The Stinky Cheese Man book for the purposes of this review, it seem that Glore has added little besides music, which is mostly just famous classical pieces with simpleminded words thrown onto the main motif, such as you’ve heard done hundreds of times with the opening of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

    One thing Glore can’t incorporate is the book’s striking artwork. Neither can the Garage Theatre. As always, the Garage make their tiny space serviceable, but visually there’s not a lot going on with this production.

    That leaves it to the actors to make The Stinky Cheese Man work, and no doubt they infuse their multiple roles with sufficient cartoonish energy. Sally Nguyen is a standout from her first moments on stage as Chicken Licken (a.k.a. Chicken Little), but everyone is good. The ensemble highlight is a gangsta rap number featuring the Ugly Duck (Nori Tecosky, who can quack with the best of them). “Word to your mallard.”

    That’s it? you’re asking as your gaze reveals how little is left of this review. Indeed it is. There’s no plot, no character development about which to write. The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales is by design a superficial entertainment and perhaps a nice nostalgia trip for a certain demographic. It also fits squarely within the Garage Theatre tradition of closing each season with something simply silly. Maybe that’s just what you need at a time when each mention of the phrase “president-elect” makes your gorge rise. Just don’t buy a ticket expecting anything more.

    THE STINKY CHEESE MAN AND OTHER FAIRLY STUPID TALES THE GARAGE THEATRE • 251 E 7TH ST (JUST OFF LONG BEACH BLVD) • LONG BEACH 90813 • 562.433.8337 THEGARAGETHEATRE.ORG • THURS-SAT 8PM + SAT 2PM • $15–$20 (THURSDAY TIX ARE 2-FOR-1) • THROUGH DECEMBER 17

    (Photo credit: FreshFrameFoto.com)

    Read More
  • Black Girl Nerds: Refuse to Conform

    By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

    Marqueeda LaStar

    Marqueeda LaStar. Courtesy photo

    Growing up,  Marqueeda LaStar was fascinated with the comic book world, specifically the X-Men and its array of super-powered mutants.

    Her favorite character: Jubilee, a mutant with the power to generate pyrotechnic energy plasmoids from her hands, though she had heart for Wolverine and Storm. It was the geeky world of comics that inspired LaStar to get her degree in molecular biotechnology and genetics, with a minor in digital media at California State University Polytechnic Pomona.

    “We did the Mendelian experiment with the color of the flowers,” said LaStar, recalling a science experiment in elementary school. “Mendelian genetics is the basics of all modern genetics. So pollinate different flowers, mix the colors, see the expression — very simple genetics. ‘This is genetics?’ I said, ‘Wait a minute, I’ve heard that word before: There is the X-gene.’”

    Her world came full circle a few years ago, when she discovered a website that spoke to her interests as an artistic, queer woman with a love for science and punk music. She followed it and, in time, she became the social community manager and curator of Black Girl Nerds. The site is an online safe space for black girls, women and allies to geek out on anything from manga and technology to politics and pop culture.

    “It’s a focus, but there is not tunnel vision, and when we get back to the whole geeking-out thing, different things you can geek out about, from cosplay, anime, languages, technology, games, that is something that every group of people, no matter what your background is [can enjoy],” LaStar said.

    snapchat-4203466132571808569-169x300

    Jamie Broadnax. File photo

    Creator Jamie Broadnax came up with the idea for the haven site in February 2012 after Googling the three terms and coming up with nothing. The name goes against the concept of black women being an anomaly to geekdom. Black Girl Nerds is not about one or two specific genres or categories. In fact, it goes in all different directions, offering something for most types of geeks. Also, the content is not specific to black people or issues.

    “The term ‘Black Girl Nerd’ … is a term of endearment to all women like me who have been attached to a stigma that is not an accurate representation of my personality or my idiosyncratic behaviors,” said Broadnax in the site’s About page. “This is a website for every nerdy girl [who] can finally come out of the closet and tell the world that they are PROUD to be who they are — no matter what anyone says, does, or thinks.”

    The stigma Broadnax speaks about refers to the idea that women and, in particular, black women, are outsiders to an intellectual world where imagination, science, fiction and technology inhabit the same realm. In American culture, people who have a fascination with that realm are relegated to geekdom or nerd status, an undesirable. Add color into the mix and an array of misconceptions rise to the surface. From an inter-cultural standpoint, being smart and enjoying things that are eccentric are often looked at as a form of dissimilation from black culture.

    LaStar is one of those incongruent women, who, from an early age went against the norm.

    “You can be a nerd about anything,” LaStar said. “There [are] art nerds; there [are] music nerds. I look at hip-hop and rap heads … ‘You a nerd dog … what you think you is? But that is OK. It kind of ties back with that whole being called an ‘Oreo’ thing, where you can be a class clown but you better not excel. … I definitely had the whole, ‘Oh, you’re cute but you act hella white.’ I was like ‘What does that mean?’ By the time I was in high school I would shut you down in a heartbeat.”

    She learned one important lesson at 13, while she was in the seventh grade.

    “When you don’t care, kids love you,” she said. “I was super popular in eighth grade.”

    Unlike some who may have bowed to peer pressure, LaStar had a strong support system at school and at home.

    “I had parents at home who were like, ‘My baby is fine the way she is, you need to back up,’” LaStar said. “They would check people… When I got older I realized [they] were like, ‘We didn’t always get you but we understood that we had to protect and nurture you.’ I often tell people that my relationship with my family and their understanding of me is not common. I recognize how unique it was.”

    That’s why a space such as Black Girl Nerds is important, especially in this digital age, she said.

    “Social media is empowering,” LaStar said. “You want your voice to be heard, just get out there and say your peice. That’s actually what made me step up with Black Girl Nerds … it’s the idea that it starts with me.”

    As curator she tries to add value to the website not only by incorporating content that interests her, such as science or queer issues, but also content that is inspiring, empowering and interesting to her diverse audience.

    “[Black Girl Nerds] fills a void,” she said. “You go there knowing that you can geek out.”

    As a curator, LaStar wants to encourage bringing the virtual world into the real world, she is hoping to host meet ups where people in the Black Girl Nerds community can meet in person.

    Read More
  • Fake News and the Rise of the False Alt-Press

    Social media and the cause of fact-less opinions

    By James Preston Allen, Publisher

    amanpourpostChristiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, just won an award for championing press freedom. She is also one of the better-known faces in the mainstream media.

    In her acceptance speech at the 2016 Burton Benjamin Memorial Award at a Nov. 22 gala in New York — an event organized by the Committee to Protect Journalists—she said about her fellow journalists’ coverage of the recent elections:

    Much of the media was tying itself in knots trying to differentiate between balance, between objectivity, neutrality, and crucially, the truth. We cannot continue the old paradigm. We cannot, for instance, keep saying, like it was over global warming. When 99 percent of the science, the empirical facts, the evidence, is given equal play with the tiny minority of deniers.

    She took note of the president-elect’s tweets accusing the media instigating the uprising of protests:

    I was chilled when [Trump’s] first tweet after the election was about professional protesters incited by the media. [Because as we all know] First the media is accused of inciting, then sympathizing, then associating. And then, suddenly, they find themselves accused of being full-fledged terrorists and subversives. And then, they end up in handcuffs, in cages, in kangaroo courts, in prisons and then who knows what.

    A sentiment with which I couldn’t agree more.

    In another tweet, Trump alleged that 3 million illegal voters cast votes in an election he won, albeit losing the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by some 2.5 million votes—a number that continues to grow.

    It was only after Trump called the leading national journalists to his “Tower” for a scolding about their treatment during the campaign and the New York Times stood up to him that other major media companies began tentatively calling him out on his lies, false accusations and otherwise aberrant pronouncements.

    On Nov. 5, the Toronto Star newspaper published their list of Trump’s lies—494 in all that fell into 20 different categories. They wrote, “the category that has the most falsehoods is ‘Clinton’s policies,’ followed by ‘Clinton’s corruption,’ and then polls.”

    That list is far too long to be printed here but can be found on Slate.com  at http://tinyurl.com/Trump-s-lies.

    Since that time the presumptive president-elect has backed off on his pledge to prosecute Hilary, appoint a special prosecutor and throw her in jail. However, no one can be quite sure exactly what Trump will say next or even if he’ll do what he says next.

    This of course is his real talent:  keeping everyone on edge. A negotiating trick that keeps everyone one guessing until the deal is done.  Stand back from the anxiety of the campaign and the depression from the election results to see Trump for the wheeler-dealer huckster he is.

    I was reminded this week of a quote from one of our nation’s most celebrated journalists, H.L. Mencken, who in 1920, had the prescient vision to write:

    The larger the mob, the harder the test. In small areas, before small electorates, a first-rate man occasionally fights his way through, carrying even the mob with him by force of his personality. But when the field is nationwide, and the fight must be waged chiefly at second and third hand, and the force of personality cannot so readily make itself felt, then all the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre — the man who can most easily adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum. The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron. 

    I think at this point the emphasis should be on devious and mediocre—clearly this man, Trump, is not to be trusted either by his own party, the people who voted for him or the rest of us who didn’t.

    It is becoming quite clear that it’s very difficult to discern fact from fiction in the media environment in which we live. People say we’re living in a post-factual era of politics, but there are several sources to fact check what you read or hear.

    Wikipedia and Snopes.com, however, is the antidote to that. And for those looking deeper into the fictionalization of facts here’s a list of those fake news sites see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites. And even at Wikipedia, we have to pay attention to who is editing what.

    Contrary to the accusations of some trolls on our website, we at Random Lengths News do check our facts. But we do not pretend to be neutral.

    This newspaper has always defended its brand of informed political reporting. Our progressive reporting is not blindly partisan, but is informed by a perspective not commonly found in the corporate mainstream press.

    This paradigm is now changing. We now live in a world where ultra-right wing and neo-fascist ideologies threaten even the middle-of-the-road media. Breitbart News is a leading example of this phenomenon and the elevation of  Stephen K. Bannon to the position of chief political strategist for the Trumpster—with an office inside the White House is disconcerting.

    Bannon’s claim to fame is his role as the executive chairman of Breitbart News,  a media outlet filled with what the New York Times called “ideologically driven journalists,” that has been a  source of controversy “over material that has been called misogynist, xenophobic and racist,” and was a “potent voice” for Trump’s presidential campaign.

    Breitbart News has been misidentified and normalized by calling it “alt-right” media; it has been aligned with European populist right wing and what I would call fascist politics. This invention of alt-right news of course is the reaction to the myth of the “liberal media” in America.

    With the birth of Roger Ailes’ Fox News, there’s a growing rant that “all of the media are a bunch of liberals.”

    Information wars between left and right perspectives are fueled by the increasing use of disinformation—leaked or hacked information from dubious sources and the growing distrust of the media in general.

    What has clearly evolved out of this past election cycle is that some media platforms have become “weaponized” for use in disinformation warfare—a tactic that has its roots in the CIA’s covert operations from the Cold War Era.

    This, at its very core, is a threat to our democracy and the institutions of electoral politics.  It is curious that these very same tactics are being brought home to roost in the very same chicken coop from which they were hatched—Washington, D.C.

    And all of this confusion effectuated by the rise of social media and convenient hand-held devices has only brought us closer to the truth that all democracies are fragile and dependent upon a public being able to deconstruct the information provided. Therein lies the great divide separating America today. What media outlet do you trust to tell you the truth?

    Read More
  • Go Retro with Records

    By Lyn Jensen, Reporter

    Music fans, here is your chance to go retro and spend happy hours digging through record store bins. Five old-time rockin’ record stores in Long Beach and San Pedro offer a chance to give the gift of music, in a variety of media —

    33 ½ revolutions per minute, 45 rpm, compact discs and even a few cassette tapes. You’ll also find holiday music to give you a soundtrack for the season. So get out there and hop from store to store to find collectibles, DVDs and shirts, along with surprise finds that only come from old-fashioned store shopping.

    JDC Records

    On First Thursday at San Pedro’s Artwalk, JDC Records is having a grand opening of its vinyl record retail store.

    Jim Callon of JDC Records brought their record distributorship back to San Pedro two years ago after spending almost 20 years in Hermosa Beach on  Pier Avenue. Music fans will remember JDC Records. Callon’s original location was on Pacific Avenue across from Fort MacArthur, before it moved to 5th Street.

    When JDC Records moved to its current digs in downtown San Pedro on 6th Street, its massive inventory of vinyl was available only to those willing to search through  vinyl records, cassette tapes and CD stacked ceiling high. They were accessible  through the backdoor entrance off the alley. On Dec. 1, Callon is  opening  the retail end of JDC Records, where lovers of high fidelity music can come   through the front door to search through organized album stacks.

    Jim Callon is happy to be back in his hometown.

    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon. through Fri., and Sat. until 4 p.m.
    Details: (424) 264-5335
    Venue: JDC Records, 447 W. 6th St, San Pedro

    The Grand Emporium

    The Grand Emporium is another retail store that sells vinyl records, CDs, cassettes, books and collectible memorabilia thoughtfully selected and organized by proprietor Chuck Klaus. Random Lengths News will be publishing a feature on this unique store in the coming edition.

    Time: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday
    Details: (310) 514-8429
    Venue: The Grand Emporium, 323 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Third Eye

    You’ll find about 3,400 new and used records — vinyl LPs — in the heart of Retro Row, a collection of several blocks of indy storefront businesses. Gary Farley opened Third Eye in Costa Mesa in 2002 and later relocated to Retro Row.

    “When my job ended as general manager for a local retail store, I decided to turn my passion for music and record collecting into a career and have been enjoying the experience ever since,” Farley recalled.

    He said that millennials, who can’t remember the days before CDs, are now seeking out the analog recording technology their parents and grandparents know and love. They come to Third Eye for that experience.

    “I am always seeking record collections and music memorabilia (including shirts and posters) and pay cash or offer credit,” Farley said.

    Third Eye has long had a reputation as a source for imports, local music, punk and hard-to-find items. Listening stations are available so you may try before you buy. Other perks include a delivery service (add $5 to your order) and cleaning records (for 25 cents each).

    Time: 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Sunday
    Details: (714) 415-9814; thirdeyerecordshop.com
    Venue: Third Eye, 2234 4th St., Long Beach

    Bagatelle Records

    Steve Mintz is the owner of Bagatelle Records, a landmark in Long Beach.

    “I carry all categories of music, not so much new, mostly used and collectible,” he said.

    He buys and stocks some CDs, but he’s mostly looking for old-fashioned phonograph records — be they 78, 45 or 33-1/3 rpm. Visitors will find the store front’s 1,000 square feet crammed full with bins of 45s, LPs, 78s, 12-inch singles, CDs, and some music memorabilia — about 40,000 items in stock at any one time.

    Bagatelle started out as a “junk store” in 1974, Mintz remarked, but it soon became a record shop. In 1977, the shop moved to its current location just south of Third Street.

    Be prepared to spend some time browsing and digging in the two aisles that are less than a yard wide. Want to sample before you buy? There’s an in-store listening station.

    Time: 11a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday
    Details: bagatellerecords.com, (562) 432-7534
    Venue: Bagatelle Records, 260 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

    Fingerprints

    You’ll have to visit Fingerprints under the neon guitar in Long Beach’s Arts District to see the full range of holiday gift possibilities. Its stock ranges from records to apparel, guitar straps, storage crates, memorabilia and incense. This comfortably large store in the downtown arts district stocks thousands of old-school vinyl LPs, alongside tens of thousands of CDs, DVDs, 45s — even some cassette tapes. (There used to be VHS tapes, too, but alas, no more.) You may also sell your used LPs, DVDs, and CDs for in-store credit.

    With enough floor space for just about every genre and music medium, lovingly used collectables mingle with the latest releases.  Many of them are sealed copies, the preferred choice for gifts. Country fans will be surprised with sealed LPs by such contemporary stars as Kellie Pickler, Willie Nelson and Lyle Lovett. If you’re in a Woodstock frame of mind, you may prefer to trip out on collectable vinyl rarities, including maybe, just maybe, that certain Beatles LP still in shrink wrap. Punks, there’s something completely different for you too, perhaps a new and unused shrink-wrapped copy of Patti Smith’s Horses LP.

    Time: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday
    Details: fingerprintzmusic.com
    Venue: Fingerprints, 420 E. 4th St., Long Beach

     

     

    Read More
  • Sison Takes on 555 East

    Chef Chris Sison, Photo by Phillip Cooke

    Article by Katrina Guevara, Contributing Writer

    ­­The day San Pedro’s 7th Street Chophouse closed was a sad one for anyone addicted to restaurant’s the innovative menu and live music scene. Executive Chef Chris Sison’s work during his four-year tenure in the kitchen contributed hugely to the memories that people made there.

    At the Chophouse, Sison aimed to bring a diverse flair to his menu, which included flat-bread, seared ahi tuna, Tex-Mex rolls, spinach dip, chicken, shrimp, carnitas tacos and mini Kobe burgers. And that was just the appetizers menu,

    Sison grew up in the City of Carson, experiencing a lot of diverse cultures and cuisines.

    “ I grew up around Japanese folks, Hawaiian, Belizean, Jamaican, Filipino,” he said during a 2013 interview with Random Lengths. “At the time. I went to a lot of these kids houses and experienced a lot of these cuisines.”

    Those influences were apparent in Sison’s menu at the Chophouse. When the restaurant closed in 2013, Sison applied to become a line cook at 555 East American Steakhouse in Long Beach. He wanted to challenge himself. There, under the guidance of Chef Douglas Farnsworth, Sison polished his techniques for preparing swordfish and filet mignon. In time, he was elevated from line cook to executive chef.

    The 555 East — aka as “the fives” — specializes in corn-fed, hand-cut and aged USDA prime steak. It has been serving “the king of beef” to the people of Long Beach for almost two decades. Here’s what Chef Sison has to say about his first month in the kitchen as the executive chef.

    Katrina Guevara: Would you try to describe 555 East in five words?

    Chris Sison: Professional, teamwork, leadership and classic steakhouse.

     

    KG: Are there any regional dishes at 555 East that you have yet to develop?

    CS: We actually leave this up to the regional chefs to develop items.  We execute the dishes to their liking.

     

    KG: Approximately how many pounds of steak are prepared and served daily?

    CS: 200 to 300 pounds a day.

     

    KG: In general, how would you say steakhouses have changed in the past 10 years?

    CS: I would say the quality of meat has changed, in addition to the identification of different meats from guests.

     

    KG: What is the most rewarding experience at your job?

    CS: The most rewarding experience for me is that King’s Seafood Co. is supporting my vision to become the executive chef, among other possible, further opportunities. I started as a line cook three years ago and have been striving for more daily.

     

    KG: How do you prefer your steak? Is that what you suggest everyone order?

    CS: For prime steak, I prefer medium. I would suggest others to order it the same.

     

    KG: How is 555 involved with the local community?

    CS: We are involved in the community by participating in charities. We make donations to schools. We also participated in the Ronald McDonald charity walk recently.

     

    KG: If you could serve a dish from your restaurant to any public figure, what would be the dish and who would be the person?

    CS: I would serve a medium “bone-in ribeye” and a “loaded baked potato” with cheese, sour cream, butter, bacon and chives to Tom Colicchio of Craft Steakhouse. The reason being is, I really enjoyed his restaurant and would like him to see us do simple done right.

     

    The 555 East American Steakhouse is located at 555 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach. For more info., visit: http://www.555east.com/.

    Read More
  • Bobby Moon, Paul 'Pablo' Thomas' Spell on Sacred Grounds

    ENTERTAINMENT

    Dec. 1
    Bobby Moon,  Paul ‘Pablo’ Thomas
    Bobby Moon and Paul “Pablo” Thomas will spellbound you with a special acoustic performance.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: selfishrecordings@yahoo.com
    Venue: Sacred Grounds, 468 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Night Owl Party by the Sea
    Come drink and play pool with us as we rock out in San Pedro at Harold’s Place. It’s free and the drinks are cheap. And check out a band called, Klaymation.
    Time: 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 832-5503; jenrules323@aol.com
    Venue: Harold’s Place, 1908 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Namhee Han
    Playing from the heart defines Namhee Han’s approach to music making. Namhee has been a featured artist at national and regional conventions of the American Guild of Organists.
    Time: 12 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 316-5574; www.palosverdes.com/ClassicalCrossroads/FirstFridays.htm
    Venue: First Lutheran Church and School, 2900 W. Carson St., Torrance

    Dec. 3
    Wagman’s Gold, Silver Celebration
    KJazz 88.1 FM presents a concert celebrating the career of Gary “The Wagman” Wagner, host of the station’s long-running weekend show, Nothin’ But the Blues, Headlining this special evening are Walter Trout and Friends, Janiva Magness, Coco Montoya and The Alastair Greene Band.
    Time: 7 to 10 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $55
    Details: www.jazzandblues.org, http://tinyurl.com/Wagman-Gold
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Woodie and The Longboards
    Named America’s No. 1 Beach Boy Tribute Band, Woodie and the Longboards began performing music from the 60s and 70s in 2002 and haven’t looked back. Be part of a night packed with Good, Good, Good, Good Vibrations.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $35
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Frank Unzueta
    Join jazz pianist-composer-guitarist Frank Unzueta for an unforgettable night of Latin and Brazilian jazz sounds featuring his original compositions. Also featuring vocalist Jonathan Karrant.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25
    Details:  (310) 519-1314; www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue:  Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Handel’s Messiah
    Light up your Holidays with a chamber version of Handel’s magnificent Messiah, featuring professional soloists and baroque instrumentation.
    Time:  4:30 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: $10 to $50
    Details: http://longbeachcameratasingers.org
    Venue: Beverley O’Neill Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Anita Chang, Rodney Oakes
    The Los Angeles Harbor College Music Department presents Anita Chang and Rodney Oakes during an evening concert. Chang will perform two Brahms’s intermezzos, Two leider from Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words, and Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in D major. Oakes will premiere his Bag of Tales for trombone and electronics, Prelude and Fantasy for two trombones with guest trombonist Greg Lee and a new piano work with video accompaniment, Piano Odyssey. Together, they will premiere Oakes’ Four Bagatelles for sackbut and piano.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 233- 4429
    Venue: LA Harbor College Music Recital Hall, 1111 Figueroa Place, Wilmington

    Jim Kimo West, Ken Emerson
    Celebrate the holiday season with some kick-back, stress-reducing island vibes. Kimo’s annual Holiday Slack Key Show will feature terrific hula.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: $20
    Details:  310-519-1314; www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue:  Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Warehouse One Holiday Show
    The second annual ska-rock holiday show with San Pedro’s favorite local band. Originals, covers and classics will put you in a festive spirit with a rockin’ hometown twist. Opening act: Law.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $15 to $30
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Nili Brosh
    Instrumental progressive rock-fusion will feature original music by Nili Brosh.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost:  $20.00
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St, San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    The 19th Annual Carlos Vega Memorial Birthday Concert
    Carlos Vega was a renowned recording artist who had recorded and/or performed with Freddy Hubbard, Boz Scaggs, Lee Ritenour, Vince Gill, Reba McIntire, Olivia Newton-John, Larry Carlton, Linda Ronstadt, Joni Mitchell, and Randy Newman, before he died in 1998. Those paying tribute at this show include David Garfield (keyboards) and special guests Frank Gambale, Michael Thompson, James Harrah, Denny Dias (guitars); John “JR” Robinson, Gary Novak, Jimmy Branly, Steve Ferrone, Walfredo Reyes Jr. Oscar Seaton (drummers); Jimmy Earl (bass), Alex Ligertwood (vocals).
    Time: 4 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost:  $50.00
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    Joy to the World!
    Justin Rudd and his nonprofit Community Action Team invite the public to a free, 90-minute “Joy to the World” Christmas concert. All ages and all sizes of groups are welcome.
    Time: 4:30 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details:  https://2016joytotheworld.eventbrite.com
    Venue: Bay Shore Church, 5100 E. The Toledo, Long Beach

    Dec. 17
    Fleetwood Mac vs  Heart
    Gaslamp Long Beach presents Fleetwood Mac vs Heart featuring Mirage and Dog n Butterfly.  This is a concert and dinner show you don’t want to miss.
    Time: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17
    Cost: $15 to $58
    Details: www.gaslamptix.com
    Venue: Gaslamp Lounge, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach

    Dec. 17
    Holiday POPS Spectacular
    The annual “Holiday POPS Spectacular” continues with festive music and high spirits. Celebrate the holiday season by joining the Golden State Pops Orchestra, Maestro Steven Allen Fox, and the GSPO Chorale, led by Maestra Marya Basaraba.
    Time: 8 p.m., Dec. 17
    Cost: $29 to $60
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 18
    Celtic Music
    World’s Most Recorded Piper” Eric Rigler (soloist on Braveheart, Titanic, The Simpsons, etc.) and multi-talented string player Dirk Freymuth team-up to create a musical panorama of Celtic spirit and energy. Drawing from haunting Irish melodies, barn-burning jigs and reels, and themes from Eric’s film and television work, the duo produce a hearing-is-believing sonic experience.
    Time: 4 p.m. Dec. 18
    Cost:  $20
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Jan. 1
    New Year’s Eve 2016 in DTLB
    The DLBA will not only once again host the largest party in town, it has shifted gears to one-up itself as it welcomes a plethora of the world’s finest musicians to take part in a three-stage, three-block festival in the heart of Downtown located on Pine Avenue between 1st and 4th Streets. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings and Citizen Cope are headlining this year with each bringing guests to perform throughout the evening. Those guests include a special DJ set from Cut Copy, electro-dance master Big Data, reggae songstress HIRIE, house DJ Plastic Plates, and Latin soul group Boogaloo Assassins. Joining them are The Delta Bombers, DJ Paul V., DJ Taharba, and Sizwe the DJ.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 31
    Cost: $40
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/DTLB-NYE
    Venue: Downtown Long Beach

    THEATER

    dont-dress-for-dinner-press-photo-13

    Victoria Serra (SUZETTE), Mitchell Nunn (GEORGE), Yvonne Robertson (JACQUELINE), Della Lisi (SUZANNE) (Michael Hardy Photography)

    Dec. 3
    Don’t Dress For Dinner
    Bernard’s plans for a romantic rendezvous with his mistress are complete with a gourmet caterer and an alibi courtesy of his friend, Robert. But when Bernard’s wife learns that Robert will be visiting for the weekend, she decides to stay in town for a surprise tryst of her own… setting the stage for a collision course of assumed identities and outrageous infidelities.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 3
    Cost: $14 to $24
    Details: (562) 494-1014; www.lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Dec. 3
    She Loves Me
    She Loves Me follows the story of Georg and Amalia, two parfumerie clerks who aren’t quite the best of friends. Constantly bumping heads while on the job, the sparring coworkers can’t seem to find common ground.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $27 to $32
    Details: (562) 856-1999, ext. 4; www.musical.org
    Venue: Beverly O’Neill Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

    Dec. 10
    The Nutcracker
    San Pedro City Ballet returns with a holiday season tradition, featuring their corps de ballet and some of San Pedro’s ballet stars of the future. This is truly a magical experience for the entire family.
    Time: Dec. 10 and 11
    Cost: $19 to  $39
    Details: www.sanpedrocityballet.org
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    A Very Special Holiday Special
    The Palos Verdes/South Bay Group of the Sierra Club invites you to a holiday outing to see A Very Special Holiday Special, a light comedy by Mark Harvey Levine. From a talking Christmas tree, Grandma’s visit to the babe in the manger, the sons of Israel watching a flame, and Les Miz — elf-style — you’ll love this holiday evening full of theatrical stocking stuffers.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $22
    Details: (310) 383-5247
    Venue: Little Fish Theater, 777 Centre St., San Pedro

    FILM

    Dec. 2
    How the Grinch Stole Christmasdr-seuss-how-the-grinch-stole-christmas-gallery-1
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Elf
    The San Pedro Property Owners’ Alliance Business Improvement District presents Elf.
    Time: 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: $5
    Venue: The Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 9
    Elf
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 16
    Frozen
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 23
    It’s A Wonderful Life 70th Anniversary
    Be part of a holiday classic. It’s the 70th Anniversary of Frank Capra’s timeless It’s A Wonderful Life.  1940’s dress encouraged.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 23
    Cost: $10
    Details: http://spiffest-wonderful-life.bpt.me
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    ARTS

    Dec. 1
    Nu Landscapecapture
    Pac Arts proudly presents Luis Sanchez in this unique solo exhibition. Start you First Thursday Art Walk with a festive meet and greet.
    Time: 6 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562)436-0700
    Venue: Pacific Avenue Arts Colony, 303 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Palos Verdes Art Center Holiday Art Sale
    Since 1975, Palos Verdes Art Center has offered an art sale to welcome the holiday season.  This year’s PVAC Student and Instructor Holiday Sale will feature ceramics, glass, textiles and jewelry, as well as painting, drawing and prints.  A percentage of the proceeds funds much needed equipment for the PVAC studios.
    Time: 1 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 541-2479
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 W. Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Dec. 7
    Long Beach Remembers Pearl Harbor
    For three years the Historical Society of Long Beach has been preparing for an exhibition chronicling the effects of the fateful day when the Japanese Empire attacked the United States Naval Fleet, 75 years ago. The show chronicles local tidelands and maritime activities that related to the early years of World War II, illustrates how ordinary people who lived here were affected, and how those events are echoed in present day Long Beach. The free exhibition will be open five days a week and runs for 15 months. Hours are from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, from 1 to 7 p.m. Thursday, and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
    Time: 6 p.m. Dec. 7
    Cost: $60 to $75
    Details: www.hslb.org
    Venue: Historical Society of Long Beach, 4260 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

    Dec. 10
    On Being Blue
    TransVagrant and Gallery 478 are pleased to present On Being Blue, Recent Works by Jay McCafferty. Electing the neutrality of the grid as an organizing principle, McCafferty has been creating artworks by focusing rays of sunlight on its points of intersection for more than three decades.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, through Dec. 10
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 600-4873
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 12
    Altered Objects
    Altered Objects offers a reimagining of everyday objects by three Los Angeles artists: Julie Schustack, Tina Turturici, and Nicolas Shake. Shake builds his ghost sculptures from a tire, a shovel, or a palm tree frond, but they change within the context of the media and color he employs. Turturici recreates everyday objects in multiple media including ink drawings, collage, paintings and 3D objects. While Schustack combines found objects with her unique ceramic forms to create mysterious sculptures that capture the essence of time and change, especially her works related to music.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, through Dec. 12
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 243-3334
    Venue: University Art Gallery, LaCorte Hall, A-107, California State University Dominguez Hills, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

    Dec. 16
    Have an EPIC Election! Exhibit Opens at CSU Dominguez Hills
    An election history exhibition Have an EPIC Election! 100 Years of National and California Elections is showing at California State University Dominguez Hills Library Cultural Arts Gallery. Through newspaper headlines and campaign materials of older campaigns juxtaposed with more recent elections, the exhibition presents a case for how much things have changed and how much they’ve stayed the same.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, through Dec. 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 243-3895
    Venue: CSUDH, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

    Dec. 31
    L.A. Noir
    Since 1999, Mark V. Lord has plied his trade as a professional screenwriter in New York and Los Angeles, while maintaining a mostly private practice as a photographer.
    Lord’s images of Los Angeles are filled with the deep shadows and low-key lighting characteristic of these films, but with a decidedly contemporary twist.
    Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays.
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.pvartcenter.org
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Jan. 15, 2017
    Chiaroscuro
    Cornelius Projects is pleased to present new paintings by San Pedro artist Candice Gawne. The exhibition will also include an installation of several of Gawne’s signature plasma glass sculptures in the Cornelius Projects’ screening room.
    Time: 12 to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Jan. 15, 2017
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 266-9216; corneliusprojects.com
    Venue: Cornelius Projects, 1417 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    COMMUNITY

    Dec. 1
    San Pedro Tree Lighting
    Join a family-friendly event at the annual tree lighting.
    Time: 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 732-4515
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Candy Cane Lane
    For the past 31 years Weymouth Corners Merchants have sponsored this free community event. The street is lit with twinkling lights and Santa is expected to arrive for the children to enjoy.
    Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Details: (310) 519-0966
    Venue: Weymouth Corners, 8th Street, between Weymouth and Averill, San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Victorian Christmas LuncheonHoliday Banning Museum
    Join the friends of the Banning Museum in kicking off the holidays in style at their annual Christmas luncheon in the historic Stagecoach Barn. Guests will enjoy an elegant plated lunch, special live holiday entertainment, an exclusive look at the Banning Mansion decorated for Christmas and a viewing of our newest exhibit, The March of the California Column: 900 Miles to Battle in the Norris Luncheon Visitor Center..
    Time: 11:30 a.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Tickets are $95 for non-members and $85 for Friends of Banning Museum members.
    Details: (310) 548-2005; www.thebanningmuseum.org
    Venue:  Banning Museum, 401 E. M St., Wilmington

    Dec. 2
    Beyond Big Fish
    Meet Dr. Daniel Pondella II of Occidental College and Southern California Marine Institute. Southern California has one of the most dynamic and productive marine rocky-reef ecosystems in the world.  Its characteristic giant kelp beds are a visual reminder from the surface of the majestic expanse found below.
    Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562; lecture@cmaqua.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 3
    Best of LGBT Long Beach
    Celebrate the LGBT best of the best during the fourth annual Best of LGBT Long Beach. This year will include an award show to remember.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $30
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/2016BestofLGBTLB
    Venue: The Packard, 205 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Dec. 3
    Victorian Christmas Weekend Celebration
    Join the friends of the Banning Museum in opening the holiday season in grand style at the Banning Museum’s annual Victorian Christmas Celebration and Open House. Visitors will get to enjoy period entertainment, tours of the Museum decorated in holiday splendor, refreshments, a children’s craft, a blacksmith, a horse-drawn trolley ride between The Banning Museum and Drum Barracks Civil War Museum as well as local food and craft vendors.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3 and Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.thebanningmuseum.org
    Venue:  Banning Museum, 401 E. M St., Wilmington

    Dec. 3
    Wilmington Winter Wonderland
    In previous years the Wilmington Winter Wonderland has exceeded 2,500 people, with lines wrapped around the block filled with children looking to play in the snow.
    Time: 11:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org
    Venue: Wilmington Waterfront Park, near C Street at Harry Bridges Boulevard, Wilmington

    Los Angeles Holiday Harbor Afloat Parade
    The parade of boats lit like Christmas trees will start in the East Basin near Banning’s Landing Community Center in Wilmington and will take about 90 minutes to cover the entire parade route up POLA’s Main Channel. Spectators may view the procession from several points along the channel, including the Banning’s Landing Community Center, 100 E. Water St., Wilmington; the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, 600 Sampson Way, San Pedro; Ports O’ Call Village, 1100 Nagoya Way, San Pedro; the Cruise Ship Promenade at Harbor Boulevard and Swinford Street, San Pedro; 22nd Street Landing, 141 W. 22nd Street, San Pedro; and Cabrillo Marina, 200 Whaler’s Walk, San Pedro.
    Time: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org
    Location: Wilmington and San Pedro

    Dec. 3
    Makers Market
    It’s the holiday “sea”son at Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s Gift Shop. A spirited group of accomplished artists and artisans from the local community will be showcasing and selling their wares.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    San Pedro Holiday Parade
    The Spirit of San Pedro Holiday Parade is celebrating its 36th year, from 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 4, along Pacific Avenue and 6th Street in the heart of Los Angeles’ Harbor Area. The parade steps off at 13th Street and Pacific Avenue.
    Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org, www.sanpedrochamber.org
    Venue:  Downtown San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Lighting of the Letters at Whaley Park
    Join the Greater Los Altos Neighborhood Association as they bring back a Whaley Park tradition. There will be a Lighting of the Letters, holiday music, children activities and a special visit from Santa Claus.
    Time: 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Whaley Park, 5620 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

    Dec. 5
    Annual Dessert Potluck
    Be part of the Native Plant Society’s annual Dessert Potluck and photography presentation. Digital format on a flash drive preferred. Mounted prints will also be accepted.
    Time:  7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Dec. 5
    Cost: Free
    Details: cnps.president@yahoo.com; www.sccnps.org
    Venue: South Coast Botanic Garden, 26300 Crenshaw Blvd. , Palos Verdes

    Dec. 7
    End of Year Celebration
    You are invited to the Building Healthy Communities: Long Beach end of year celebration. The event includes free food, music and fun for the whole family.
    Time: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 436-4800
    Venue: First Congregational Church, 241 Cedar Ave., Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Wilmington Tree Lighting
    Enjoy the lighting of the community tree.
    Time: 6 to 10 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Wilmington Town Square, near I Street at Avalon Place, Wilmington

    Dec. 9
    Portraits of the Prince of Peace
    Join this celebration, presented through the joint efforts of the Neighborhood Church, St. Luke’s Lutheran, University Baptist, St. Cornelius Roman Catholic, Long Beach Christian Reformed and Calvary Chapel Long Beach. The pageant is an outdoor event featuring more than a dozen separate visual presentations with living actors and live animals depicting the prophecy and birth of Jesus Christ. There are many participating musical groups that provide Christmas music.
    Time: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 421-1721
    Venue: Wardlow Road at Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Shabbat Service
    Be part of a traditional Shabbat Service with adult birthday and anniversary blessings
    Time: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 833-2467; www.bethelsp.org
    Venue: Temple Beth El, 1435 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Tidepool Wonders
    Explore low tides on the rocky shore with Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in December. Education Staff led walk to the nearby Point Fermin Tidepools.  The area offers a home to a variety of local tidepool animals and seaweeds. Among the organisms are tidepool sculpin, sea urchins, sea hares, hermit crabs, feather-boa kelp and an occasional octopus.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 10, 12:30 to 2 p.m. Dec. 11, 11:30 to 1 p.m. Dec. 24, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 27, 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 29
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org.
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    San Pedro Democratic Club Meet and Greet
    Celebrate the holidays with fellow San Pedro Dem Club members.
    New members welcome. Light hors d’oeuvres & drinks will be served. A special tribute to President Robert Brandin.
    Time: 4:30 to 7 p.m.
    Venue: Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Bookmaking Workshop
    Participate in a bookmaking workshop for adults and teens.
    Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $25
    Details: (562) 508-6947
    Venue: Angels Gate Pop-Up Gallery, 415 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    Heart of the Holiday Parade
    Enjoy Wilmington Heart of the Holiday Parade
    Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Avalon at E Street in Wilmington

    Dec. 17
    Gyotaku
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium staff will offer a holiday workshop to teach participants Gyotaku, the ancient art of Japanese fish printing.  The lab will double as an artist’s studio where beginners and experienced fish printers can create one of a kind holiday gifts.
    Time: 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Dec. 17
    Cost: $18
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 18
    Salt Marsh Open House
    Step out into nature and discover the hidden world of the Salinas de San Pedro Salt Marsh.  Join Cabrillo Marine Aquarium educators and Coastal Park Naturalists as they help uncover the world of mud and water that is our local wetland.
    Time: 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 18
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 25
    Holiday at The Center
    Join The Center staff, community and volunteers for a Winter and Christmas day event. Enjoy a meal, play board games and share in fun times.
    Time: 3 to 6 p.m. Dec. 25
    Details: (562) 434-4455
    Venue: The Center Long Beach, 2017 E. 4th St., Long Beach

    Jan. 8
    CHILL
    The Queen Mary’s 5th Annual CHILL returns to the majestic ship. CHILL is Southern California’s coolest holiday adventure complete with ice-skating, ice tubing, swingin’ sleigh rides, visits with Santa, gingerbread decorating and the all-new interactive attraction, Alice in Winterland.
    Time: 7 p.m., through Jan. 8
    Cost: $30 to $40
    Details: www.queenmary.com/events/chill
    Venue: Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    Read More
  • Bobby Moon, Paul ‘Pablo’ Thomas’ Spell on Sacred Grounds

    ENTERTAINMENT

    Dec. 1
    Bobby Moon,  Paul ‘Pablo’ Thomas
    Bobby Moon and Paul “Pablo” Thomas will spellbound you with a special acoustic performance.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: selfishrecordings@yahoo.com
    Venue: Sacred Grounds, 468 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Night Owl Party by the Sea
    Come drink and play pool with us as we rock out in San Pedro at Harold’s Place. It’s free and the drinks are cheap. And check out a band called, Klaymation.
    Time: 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 832-5503; jenrules323@aol.com
    Venue: Harold’s Place, 1908 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Namhee Han
    Playing from the heart defines Namhee Han’s approach to music making. Namhee has been a featured artist at national and regional conventions of the American Guild of Organists.
    Time: 12 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 316-5574; www.palosverdes.com/ClassicalCrossroads/FirstFridays.htm
    Venue: First Lutheran Church and School, 2900 W. Carson St., Torrance

    Dec. 3
    Wagman’s Gold, Silver Celebration
    KJazz 88.1 FM presents a concert celebrating the career of Gary “The Wagman” Wagner, host of the station’s long-running weekend show, Nothin’ But the Blues, Headlining this special evening are Walter Trout and Friends, Janiva Magness, Coco Montoya and The Alastair Greene Band.
    Time: 7 to 10 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $55
    Details: www.jazzandblues.org, http://tinyurl.com/Wagman-Gold
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Woodie and The Longboards
    Named America’s No. 1 Beach Boy Tribute Band, Woodie and the Longboards began performing music from the 60s and 70s in 2002 and haven’t looked back. Be part of a night packed with Good, Good, Good, Good Vibrations.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $35
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Frank Unzueta
    Join jazz pianist-composer-guitarist Frank Unzueta for an unforgettable night of Latin and Brazilian jazz sounds featuring his original compositions. Also featuring vocalist Jonathan Karrant.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25
    Details:  (310) 519-1314; www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue:  Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Handel’s Messiah
    Light up your Holidays with a chamber version of Handel’s magnificent Messiah, featuring professional soloists and baroque instrumentation.
    Time:  4:30 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: $10 to $50
    Details: http://longbeachcameratasingers.org
    Venue: Beverley O’Neill Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Anita Chang, Rodney Oakes
    The Los Angeles Harbor College Music Department presents Anita Chang and Rodney Oakes during an evening concert. Chang will perform two Brahms’s intermezzos, Two leider from Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words, and Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in D major. Oakes will premiere his Bag of Tales for trombone and electronics, Prelude and Fantasy for two trombones with guest trombonist Greg Lee and a new piano work with video accompaniment, Piano Odyssey. Together, they will premiere Oakes’ Four Bagatelles for sackbut and piano.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 233- 4429
    Venue: LA Harbor College Music Recital Hall, 1111 Figueroa Place, Wilmington

    Jim Kimo West, Ken Emerson
    Celebrate the holiday season with some kick-back, stress-reducing island vibes. Kimo’s annual Holiday Slack Key Show will feature terrific hula.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: $20
    Details:  310-519-1314; www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue:  Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Warehouse One Holiday Show
    The second annual ska-rock holiday show with San Pedro’s favorite local band. Originals, covers and classics will put you in a festive spirit with a rockin’ hometown twist. Opening act: Law.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $15 to $30
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Nili Brosh
    Instrumental progressive rock-fusion will feature original music by Nili Brosh.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost:  $20.00
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St, San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    The 19th Annual Carlos Vega Memorial Birthday Concert
    Carlos Vega was a renowned recording artist who had recorded and/or performed with Freddy Hubbard, Boz Scaggs, Lee Ritenour, Vince Gill, Reba McIntire, Olivia Newton-John, Larry Carlton, Linda Ronstadt, Joni Mitchell, and Randy Newman, before he died in 1998. Those paying tribute at this show include David Garfield (keyboards) and special guests Frank Gambale, Michael Thompson, James Harrah, Denny Dias (guitars); John “JR” Robinson, Gary Novak, Jimmy Branly, Steve Ferrone, Walfredo Reyes Jr. Oscar Seaton (drummers); Jimmy Earl (bass), Alex Ligertwood (vocals).
    Time: 4 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost:  $50.00
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    Joy to the World!
    Justin Rudd and his nonprofit Community Action Team invite the public to a free, 90-minute “Joy to the World” Christmas concert. All ages and all sizes of groups are welcome.
    Time: 4:30 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost: Free
    Details:  https://2016joytotheworld.eventbrite.com
    Venue: Bay Shore Church, 5100 E. The Toledo, Long Beach

    Dec. 17
    Fleetwood Mac vs  Heart
    Gaslamp Long Beach presents Fleetwood Mac vs Heart featuring Mirage and Dog n Butterfly.  This is a concert and dinner show you don’t want to miss.
    Time: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17
    Cost: $15 to $58
    Details: www.gaslamptix.com
    Venue: Gaslamp Lounge, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach

    Dec. 17
    Holiday POPS Spectacular
    The annual “Holiday POPS Spectacular” continues with festive music and high spirits. Celebrate the holiday season by joining the Golden State Pops Orchestra, Maestro Steven Allen Fox, and the GSPO Chorale, led by Maestra Marya Basaraba.
    Time: 8 p.m., Dec. 17
    Cost: $29 to $60
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 18
    Celtic Music
    World’s Most Recorded Piper” Eric Rigler (soloist on Braveheart, Titanic, The Simpsons, etc.) and multi-talented string player Dirk Freymuth team-up to create a musical panorama of Celtic spirit and energy. Drawing from haunting Irish melodies, barn-burning jigs and reels, and themes from Eric’s film and television work, the duo produce a hearing-is-believing sonic experience.
    Time: 4 p.m. Dec. 18
    Cost:  $20
    Details: alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Jan. 1
    New Year’s Eve 2016 in DTLB
    The DLBA will not only once again host the largest party in town, it has shifted gears to one-up itself as it welcomes a plethora of the world’s finest musicians to take part in a three-stage, three-block festival in the heart of Downtown located on Pine Avenue between 1st and 4th Streets. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings and Citizen Cope are headlining this year with each bringing guests to perform throughout the evening. Those guests include a special DJ set from Cut Copy, electro-dance master Big Data, reggae songstress HIRIE, house DJ Plastic Plates, and Latin soul group Boogaloo Assassins. Joining them are The Delta Bombers, DJ Paul V., DJ Taharba, and Sizwe the DJ.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 31
    Cost: $40
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/DTLB-NYE
    Venue: Downtown Long Beach

    THEATER

    dont-dress-for-dinner-press-photo-13

    Victoria Serra (SUZETTE), Mitchell Nunn (GEORGE), Yvonne Robertson (JACQUELINE), Della Lisi (SUZANNE) (Michael Hardy Photography)

    Dec. 3
    Don’t Dress For Dinner
    Bernard’s plans for a romantic rendezvous with his mistress are complete with a gourmet caterer and an alibi courtesy of his friend, Robert. But when Bernard’s wife learns that Robert will be visiting for the weekend, she decides to stay in town for a surprise tryst of her own… setting the stage for a collision course of assumed identities and outrageous infidelities.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 3
    Cost: $14 to $24
    Details: (562) 494-1014; www.lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Dec. 3
    She Loves Me
    She Loves Me follows the story of Georg and Amalia, two parfumerie clerks who aren’t quite the best of friends. Constantly bumping heads while on the job, the sparring coworkers can’t seem to find common ground.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $27 to $32
    Details: (562) 856-1999, ext. 4; www.musical.org
    Venue: Beverly O’Neill Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

    Dec. 10
    The Nutcracker
    San Pedro City Ballet returns with a holiday season tradition, featuring their corps de ballet and some of San Pedro’s ballet stars of the future. This is truly a magical experience for the entire family.
    Time: Dec. 10 and 11
    Cost: $19 to  $39
    Details: www.sanpedrocityballet.org
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    A Very Special Holiday Special
    The Palos Verdes/South Bay Group of the Sierra Club invites you to a holiday outing to see A Very Special Holiday Special, a light comedy by Mark Harvey Levine. From a talking Christmas tree, Grandma’s visit to the babe in the manger, the sons of Israel watching a flame, and Les Miz — elf-style — you’ll love this holiday evening full of theatrical stocking stuffers.
    Time: 8 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $22
    Details: (310) 383-5247
    Venue: Little Fish Theater, 777 Centre St., San Pedro

    FILM

    Dec. 2
    How the Grinch Stole Christmasdr-seuss-how-the-grinch-stole-christmas-gallery-1
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Elf
    The San Pedro Property Owners’ Alliance Business Improvement District presents Elf.
    Time: 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: $5
    Venue: The Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 9
    Elf
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 16
    Frozen
    Come enjoy the holidays with the Battleship Iowa.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (877) 446-9261; www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 23
    It’s A Wonderful Life 70th Anniversary
    Be part of a holiday classic. It’s the 70th Anniversary of Frank Capra’s timeless It’s A Wonderful Life.  1940’s dress encouraged.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 23
    Cost: $10
    Details: http://spiffest-wonderful-life.bpt.me
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    ARTS

    Dec. 1
    Nu Landscapecapture
    Pac Arts proudly presents Luis Sanchez in this unique solo exhibition. Start you First Thursday Art Walk with a festive meet and greet.
    Time: 6 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562)436-0700
    Venue: Pacific Avenue Arts Colony, 303 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Palos Verdes Art Center Holiday Art Sale
    Since 1975, Palos Verdes Art Center has offered an art sale to welcome the holiday season.  This year’s PVAC Student and Instructor Holiday Sale will feature ceramics, glass, textiles and jewelry, as well as painting, drawing and prints.  A percentage of the proceeds funds much needed equipment for the PVAC studios.
    Time: 1 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 541-2479
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 W. Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Dec. 7
    Long Beach Remembers Pearl Harbor
    For three years the Historical Society of Long Beach has been preparing for an exhibition chronicling the effects of the fateful day when the Japanese Empire attacked the United States Naval Fleet, 75 years ago. The show chronicles local tidelands and maritime activities that related to the early years of World War II, illustrates how ordinary people who lived here were affected, and how those events are echoed in present day Long Beach. The free exhibition will be open five days a week and runs for 15 months. Hours are from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, from 1 to 7 p.m. Thursday, and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
    Time: 6 p.m. Dec. 7
    Cost: $60 to $75
    Details: www.hslb.org
    Venue: Historical Society of Long Beach, 4260 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

    Dec. 10
    On Being Blue
    TransVagrant and Gallery 478 are pleased to present On Being Blue, Recent Works by Jay McCafferty. Electing the neutrality of the grid as an organizing principle, McCafferty has been creating artworks by focusing rays of sunlight on its points of intersection for more than three decades.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, through Dec. 10
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 600-4873
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 12
    Altered Objects
    Altered Objects offers a reimagining of everyday objects by three Los Angeles artists: Julie Schustack, Tina Turturici, and Nicolas Shake. Shake builds his ghost sculptures from a tire, a shovel, or a palm tree frond, but they change within the context of the media and color he employs. Turturici recreates everyday objects in multiple media including ink drawings, collage, paintings and 3D objects. While Schustack combines found objects with her unique ceramic forms to create mysterious sculptures that capture the essence of time and change, especially her works related to music.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, through Dec. 12
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 243-3334
    Venue: University Art Gallery, LaCorte Hall, A-107, California State University Dominguez Hills, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

    Dec. 16
    Have an EPIC Election! Exhibit Opens at CSU Dominguez Hills
    An election history exhibition Have an EPIC Election! 100 Years of National and California Elections is showing at California State University Dominguez Hills Library Cultural Arts Gallery. Through newspaper headlines and campaign materials of older campaigns juxtaposed with more recent elections, the exhibition presents a case for how much things have changed and how much they’ve stayed the same.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, through Dec. 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 243-3895
    Venue: CSUDH, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

    Dec. 31
    L.A. Noir
    Since 1999, Mark V. Lord has plied his trade as a professional screenwriter in New York and Los Angeles, while maintaining a mostly private practice as a photographer.
    Lord’s images of Los Angeles are filled with the deep shadows and low-key lighting characteristic of these films, but with a decidedly contemporary twist.
    Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays.
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.pvartcenter.org
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    Jan. 15, 2017
    Chiaroscuro
    Cornelius Projects is pleased to present new paintings by San Pedro artist Candice Gawne. The exhibition will also include an installation of several of Gawne’s signature plasma glass sculptures in the Cornelius Projects’ screening room.
    Time: 12 to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Jan. 15, 2017
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 266-9216; corneliusprojects.com
    Venue: Cornelius Projects, 1417 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

    COMMUNITY

    Dec. 1
    San Pedro Tree Lighting
    Join a family-friendly event at the annual tree lighting.
    Time: 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 1
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 732-4515
    Venue: Battleship Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Candy Cane Lane
    For the past 31 years Weymouth Corners Merchants have sponsored this free community event. The street is lit with twinkling lights and Santa is expected to arrive for the children to enjoy.
    Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Details: (310) 519-0966
    Venue: Weymouth Corners, 8th Street, between Weymouth and Averill, San Pedro

    Dec. 2
    Victorian Christmas LuncheonHoliday Banning Museum
    Join the friends of the Banning Museum in kicking off the holidays in style at their annual Christmas luncheon in the historic Stagecoach Barn. Guests will enjoy an elegant plated lunch, special live holiday entertainment, an exclusive look at the Banning Mansion decorated for Christmas and a viewing of our newest exhibit, The March of the California Column: 900 Miles to Battle in the Norris Luncheon Visitor Center..
    Time: 11:30 a.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Tickets are $95 for non-members and $85 for Friends of Banning Museum members.
    Details: (310) 548-2005; www.thebanningmuseum.org
    Venue:  Banning Museum, 401 E. M St., Wilmington

    Dec. 2
    Beyond Big Fish
    Meet Dr. Daniel Pondella II of Occidental College and Southern California Marine Institute. Southern California has one of the most dynamic and productive marine rocky-reef ecosystems in the world.  Its characteristic giant kelp beds are a visual reminder from the surface of the majestic expanse found below.
    Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 2
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562; lecture@cmaqua.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 3
    Best of LGBT Long Beach
    Celebrate the LGBT best of the best during the fourth annual Best of LGBT Long Beach. This year will include an award show to remember.
    Time: 7 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: $25 to $30
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/2016BestofLGBTLB
    Venue: The Packard, 205 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    Dec. 3
    Victorian Christmas Weekend Celebration
    Join the friends of the Banning Museum in opening the holiday season in grand style at the Banning Museum’s annual Victorian Christmas Celebration and Open House. Visitors will get to enjoy period entertainment, tours of the Museum decorated in holiday splendor, refreshments, a children’s craft, a blacksmith, a horse-drawn trolley ride between The Banning Museum and Drum Barracks Civil War Museum as well as local food and craft vendors.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3 and Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.thebanningmuseum.org
    Venue:  Banning Museum, 401 E. M St., Wilmington

    Dec. 3
    Wilmington Winter Wonderland
    In previous years the Wilmington Winter Wonderland has exceeded 2,500 people, with lines wrapped around the block filled with children looking to play in the snow.
    Time: 11:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org
    Venue: Wilmington Waterfront Park, near C Street at Harry Bridges Boulevard, Wilmington

    Los Angeles Holiday Harbor Afloat Parade
    The parade of boats lit like Christmas trees will start in the East Basin near Banning’s Landing Community Center in Wilmington and will take about 90 minutes to cover the entire parade route up POLA’s Main Channel. Spectators may view the procession from several points along the channel, including the Banning’s Landing Community Center, 100 E. Water St., Wilmington; the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, 600 Sampson Way, San Pedro; Ports O’ Call Village, 1100 Nagoya Way, San Pedro; the Cruise Ship Promenade at Harbor Boulevard and Swinford Street, San Pedro; 22nd Street Landing, 141 W. 22nd Street, San Pedro; and Cabrillo Marina, 200 Whaler’s Walk, San Pedro.
    Time: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org
    Location: Wilmington and San Pedro

    Dec. 3
    Makers Market
    It’s the holiday “sea”son at Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s Gift Shop. A spirited group of accomplished artists and artisans from the local community will be showcasing and selling their wares.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    San Pedro Holiday Parade
    The Spirit of San Pedro Holiday Parade is celebrating its 36th year, from 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 4, along Pacific Avenue and 6th Street in the heart of Los Angeles’ Harbor Area. The parade steps off at 13th Street and Pacific Avenue.
    Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.portoflosangeles.org, www.sanpedrochamber.org
    Venue:  Downtown San Pedro

    Dec. 4
    Lighting of the Letters at Whaley Park
    Join the Greater Los Altos Neighborhood Association as they bring back a Whaley Park tradition. There will be a Lighting of the Letters, holiday music, children activities and a special visit from Santa Claus.
    Time: 3 p.m. Dec. 4
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Whaley Park, 5620 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

    Dec. 5
    Annual Dessert Potluck
    Be part of the Native Plant Society’s annual Dessert Potluck and photography presentation. Digital format on a flash drive preferred. Mounted prints will also be accepted.
    Time:  7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Dec. 5
    Cost: Free
    Details: cnps.president@yahoo.com; www.sccnps.org
    Venue: South Coast Botanic Garden, 26300 Crenshaw Blvd. , Palos Verdes

    Dec. 7
    End of Year Celebration
    You are invited to the Building Healthy Communities: Long Beach end of year celebration. The event includes free food, music and fun for the whole family.
    Time: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 436-4800
    Venue: First Congregational Church, 241 Cedar Ave., Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Wilmington Tree Lighting
    Enjoy the lighting of the community tree.
    Time: 6 to 10 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Wilmington Town Square, near I Street at Avalon Place, Wilmington

    Dec. 9
    Portraits of the Prince of Peace
    Join this celebration, presented through the joint efforts of the Neighborhood Church, St. Luke’s Lutheran, University Baptist, St. Cornelius Roman Catholic, Long Beach Christian Reformed and Calvary Chapel Long Beach. The pageant is an outdoor event featuring more than a dozen separate visual presentations with living actors and live animals depicting the prophecy and birth of Jesus Christ. There are many participating musical groups that provide Christmas music.
    Time: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 421-1721
    Venue: Wardlow Road at Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach

    Dec. 9
    Shabbat Service
    Be part of a traditional Shabbat Service with adult birthday and anniversary blessings
    Time: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 833-2467; www.bethelsp.org
    Venue: Temple Beth El, 1435 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Tidepool Wonders
    Explore low tides on the rocky shore with Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in December. Education Staff led walk to the nearby Point Fermin Tidepools.  The area offers a home to a variety of local tidepool animals and seaweeds. Among the organisms are tidepool sculpin, sea urchins, sea hares, hermit crabs, feather-boa kelp and an occasional octopus.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 10, 12:30 to 2 p.m. Dec. 11, 11:30 to 1 p.m. Dec. 24, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 27, 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 29
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org.
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    San Pedro Democratic Club Meet and Greet
    Celebrate the holidays with fellow San Pedro Dem Club members.
    New members welcome. Light hors d’oeuvres & drinks will be served. A special tribute to President Robert Brandin.
    Time: 4:30 to 7 p.m.
    Venue: Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

    Dec. 10
    Bookmaking Workshop
    Participate in a bookmaking workshop for adults and teens.
    Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 10
    Cost: $25
    Details: (562) 508-6947
    Venue: Angels Gate Pop-Up Gallery, 415 6th St., San Pedro

    Dec. 11
    Heart of the Holiday Parade
    Enjoy Wilmington Heart of the Holiday Parade
    Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 11
    Cost: Free
    Venue: Avalon at E Street in Wilmington

    Dec. 17
    Gyotaku
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium staff will offer a holiday workshop to teach participants Gyotaku, the ancient art of Japanese fish printing.  The lab will double as an artist’s studio where beginners and experienced fish printers can create one of a kind holiday gifts.
    Time: 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Dec. 17
    Cost: $18
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 18
    Salt Marsh Open House
    Step out into nature and discover the hidden world of the Salinas de San Pedro Salt Marsh.  Join Cabrillo Marine Aquarium educators and Coastal Park Naturalists as they help uncover the world of mud and water that is our local wetland.
    Time: 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 18
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 548-7562;  www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    Dec. 25
    Holiday at The Center
    Join The Center staff, community and volunteers for a Winter and Christmas day event. Enjoy a meal, play board games and share in fun times.
    Time: 3 to 6 p.m. Dec. 25
    Details: (562) 434-4455
    Venue: The Center Long Beach, 2017 E. 4th St., Long Beach

    Jan. 8
    CHILL
    The Queen Mary’s 5th Annual CHILL returns to the majestic ship. CHILL is Southern California’s coolest holiday adventure complete with ice-skating, ice tubing, swingin’ sleigh rides, visits with Santa, gingerbread decorating and the all-new interactive attraction, Alice in Winterland.
    Time: 7 p.m., through Jan. 8
    Cost: $30 to $40
    Details: www.queenmary.com/events/chill
    Venue: Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    Read More
  • Fig Trees Are Like Democracies

    By James Preston Allen, Publisher

    “Democracy is like growing a fig tree. It must be pruned for it to bear the best fruit. As it grows older, the pruning gives the tree its own unique and distinctive shape. But let it go too long without pruning, the tree will grow wild and the fruit it bears will be small and un-sweet.”

    From James Preston Allen’s personal journal, Second Thoughts 1997 – 2016

    As of this writing the American voters have cast 63,541,056 votes nationally for Hillary Clinton for President. That is 1,677,041 more votes than Donald Trump and the counting hasn’t stopped.

    Yet, those crucial votes were not cast in the Rust Belt states that gave the presidency to the Republican candidate—a man who is ideologically more orange than red. This orange-man candidate won most of these states by a percentage point or less.  America is truly divided.

    The flipping of the three Rust Belt states that hadn’t gone Republican since the 1980s was the big election surprise—and the decisive one. And, the most embarrassing thing of all is that the majority of the political pollsters got their predictions wrong.

    This nation is not only divided by the embarrassingly crass language of the Electoral College winner (I’m still having a hard time calling him president-elect), but also by his astoundingly right-wing and bigoted cabinet choices. We will see if the Republican majority in the U.S. Senate can stomach confirming these picks or if the Democrats have the courage to filibuster them.

    not-my-president-by-mathias-ccAs the shock of this election wears off and the anger erupts into mass demonstrations in cities across this nation, some still hold out hope that the Electoral College will come to its senses and switch their votes—a highly unlikely scenario. But if it did happen, it  would be an unusual Constitutional challenge in a year of unusual challenges.

    Here, in the much bluer part of America 61.6 percent of California voters chose Clinton over Trump. Clinton’s tally was even higher in  Los Angeles County with  71.4 percent choosing the former Secretary of State.

    Closer to home,  Trump only won 6 of the 36 precincts in the majority Republican territory of Palos Verdes Peninsula and one in Long Beach. In the greater San Pedro Harbor Area, Trump won zero precincts. Still, it hurts deeply to see the reigns of this nation being politely transferred over to a corrupt, crass blowhard like Donald Trump from the otherwise competent and intelligent control of President Barack Obama.  It clearly pains Obama to explain this to our foreign allies as much as it pains us to explain it to ourselves.

    Our form of democracy is a curious one. It’s a compromise handed down to us by the founding fathers. The compromise allows a candidate to be elected president, even after losing the popular vote—for the fifth time in our nation’s history. At least that will be the case unless 61 electors on Dec. 19 decide to become “faithless” to their party and make Clinton the winner.

    This from the National Archives and Records Administration explains why:

    The U.S. Supreme Court has held that the Constitution does not require that Electors be completely free to act as they choose and therefore, political parties may extract pledges from electors to vote for the parties’ nominees. Some state laws provide that so-called “faithless Electors” may be subject to fines or may be disqualified for casting an invalid vote and be replaced by a substitute elector. The Supreme Court has not specifically ruled on the question of whether pledges and penalties for failure to vote as pledged may be enforced under the Constitution. No Elector has ever been prosecuted for failing to vote as pledged.

    So here we are:  one of the least-qualified individuals is to be sworn into our highest office and there appears to be nothing—short of him being indicted for any of the numerous past corrupt business deals—to stop him.

    As one blogger put it, “On 9/11, we were attacked from outside our country, on 11/9 we were attacked from inside.”

    However there’s resistance brewing. The group ANSWER (Act Now to Stop War & End Racism) announced its protest during Trump’s inauguration, “Stand Against Trump, War, Racism and Inequality,” and there are more planned around the nation on the same day, including one in Los Angeles.

    The outrage and the growing number of protests are reminiscent of Richard Nixon’s inauguration to his second term in office in 1973, the backdrop of a horribly divided nation after 15 years of war in Vietnam.  That wound in our democracy was only triaged with Nixon’s  impeachment and resignation, but our nation never really healed.  One can only hope that our Congress, the media and our people have the courage to hold Trump to the highest test of democracy, and that test is the one of fair and equal governance.

    In the end, we the people must be prepared to “prune this tree of democracy” once again for the price of liberty is eternal vigilance! We can only hope that he doesn’t chop it down because he’s short on the wood he needs for building the wall.

     

    Read More
  • Harbor Area Holiday Traditions

    By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

    Tradition is sometimes a good thing. When the pace of change exceeds our ability to keep up, and when the world that we know starts to become unfamiliar, we retreat to the comfort of familiar places and rituals. We attempt to recreate memories of happier moments, even if it’s just our vision of the past through rose-tinted glasses. It’s what traditions are made for.

    Thirty-one years ago, the business owners on the 1400 block of West 8th Street in San Pedro got together to build a brand new community adventure. They called it Candy Cane Lane.  Just about every year since, the eyes of local children have grown big with hypnotic glitter of the free snacks, the face painting, the carnival games and Santa Claus.

    Years ago, Matt Lincir, owner of Alvas Music Store, created the large electrically illuminated candy cane decorations that now line the street. Each year his staff hangs them up and plugs them in.

    This year’s celebration takes place, from 5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 2, at Weymouth Corners.
    Each season, free holiday music, street dancing, carnival games and live
    entertainment compete for festival-goers’ attention.

    In the early days of Candy Cane Lane, wondering eyes could scarcely believe that Santa, with his beard so white, had truly materialized from a store’s roof top in a flurry of artificial snow.

    Mona Khalbourji, owner of Mandyz Boutique, a store that sells women’s apparel and
    accessories, oversees the vendors and games for this annual celebration.

    Among them, Crestwood Street Elementary School will teach youngsters how to make Christmas ornaments. The Parent and Teacher Organization for the Seventh Street Elementary School plans to sell candied apples and hot apple cider.

    As usual, the local Boy Scouts will host a recruitment booth and distribute glow-in-the-dark wands, while the Girl Scouts will sell hot chocolate and chocolate covered pretzels or marshmallows from a separate booth.

    Firefighters also will be present onsite to boost small children up into the fire truck so they may
    see and feel what it’s like to sit inside the cab.

    NutcrackerThe San Pedro Ballet’s production of the Nutcracker at the Warner Grand Theatre is another annual tradition. There’s something comforting about watching mice and gingerbread men fight in choreographed sequences.

    This year’s production is on Dec. 10 at the Warner Grand. Purchase tickets from the ballet home of Misty Copeland, www.sanpedroballetschool.com

    This year marks the 54th anniversary of the Afloat Parade in which a flotilla of yachts and boats lit up like Christmas trees cruise through the Los Angeles Harbor for all to see. The parade typically begins in the East Basin near Banning’s Landing Community Center in Wilmington and will take about 90 minutes to cover the entire parade route up POLA’s Main Channel.

    Spectators view the procession from several points along the channel, including the Banning’s Landing Community Center, 100 E. Water St., Wilmington; the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, 600 Sampson Way, San Pedro; Ports O’ Call Village, 1100 Nagoya Way, San Pedro; the Cruise Ship Promenade at Harbor Boulevard and Swinford Street, San Pedro; 22nd Street Landing, 141 W. 22nd Street, San Pedro; and Cabrillo Marina, 200 Whaler’s Walk, San Pedro. Viewers are invited to enjoy festive pre-parade events beginning at 4 p.m. This is relatively more recent tradition is the Winter Wonderland at Wilmington Waterfront Park, which precedes the afloat parade by a few hours.

    The Wilmington Winter Wonderland started about nine years ago. Every year, the Port of Los Angeles trucks in 20 tons of snow.  Children, mostly younger than 12, attempt to make snowballs and throw them at each other or make little hills and snow angels.

    The port often provides winter equipment such as gloves, cognizant that many of the children who will be coming have never before played in snow.

    The Port of Los Angeles was going to host the Holiday Fountain event at the Fanfare Fountain, but cancelled months ago, believing it conflicted with too many other community events.

    In what has become an annual tradition in Wilmington, the Banning Museum will be transporting guests back into time to a Victorian Christmas with people tooling around horse and buggies, women wearing big hoop skirts and men behaving like gentlemen.

    Visitors are usually treated to period entertainment (basically volunteers or actors in period clothing singing carols) and tours of Phineas Banning’s mansion, which by will be decorated in 19th century holiday splendor.

    Refreshments will be available and as well as crafts tables for making Victorian-era tree ornaments. As a special treat, a Queen Victoria re-enactor will receive guests for the two days and Jolly St. Nick will pose for photos with the children.

    This year, the Banning Museum’s Annual Victorian Christmas Celebration and Open House is from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Dec. 3 and 4, at The Banning Museum, 401 E. “M” Street, in Wilmington.

    Read More
  • American Fascist: Hope Falls, Apprentice Rises

    By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

    Day after day, massive protests have erupted in scores of cities across America in response to Donald Trump’s election to the presidency of the United States. They are ignoring the counsel of political leaders who had failed them―political leaders who seem willfully ignorant of how well Trump fits the worldwide pattern of autocratic authoritarian rulers.

    One of them, Russia’s Vladimir Putin, even played a murky behind-the-scenes role in Trump’s victory, following a documented pattern of Russian support for right-wing nationalist politicians across Western Europe.

    At the same time, a wave of hate crimes have swept across the country. The Southern Poverty Law Center collected 437 reports of hateful intimidation and harassment between the day after the election and the following Monday.

    Meanwhile, House Speaker Paul Ryan renewed talk of privatizing Medicare—the epitome of the out-of-touch elitist GOP agenda that Trump ran against. Trump’s repeated defense of Medicare and Social Security was an early part of his base appeal.

    Typically elected with minority support, autocratic rulers like Putin, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, or Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orbán consolidate their power by violating existing democratic norms; threatening, bribing and intimidating others in secret; and demonizing vulnerable racial, ethnic, religious and sexual minorities, as well as their political opposition and the free press—much of which Trump has already done during his campaign.

    They rely heavily on manipulative political theater, in place of sound, empirically-based policies arrived at through public deliberation. And the worse and the more regularly their policies fail, the more intensely and elaborately they shift blame onto others. They also benefit enormously from the erosion of hard-won social trust in established institutions. (See sidebar “Fake News Helped Elect Trump.”)

    As for bringing the nation together, outgoing Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid stood virtually alone in pointing out the obvious.

    “If this is going to be a time of healing, we must first put the responsibility for healing where it belongs: at the feet of Donald Trump, a sexual predator who lost the popular vote and fueled his campaign with bigotry and hate,” Reid said in a press release. At press time, Clinton’s popular vote lead was almost 1.7 million votes.

    “Winning the electoral college does not absolve Trump of the grave sins he committed against millions of Americans… If Trump wants to roll back the tide of hate he unleashed, he has a tremendous amount of work to do and he must begin immediately.”

    Trump’s first wave of appointments the following week proved just how right Reid had been. (See sidebar below “Trump’s Troubling Appointments”.) But other leading Democrats seemed oblivious to what was going on.

    “We must accept this result and then look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead,” Hillary Clinton said, as if she weren’t speaking about a man who campaigned on locking her up—and still might try to do so.

    “We are now all rooting for his success in uniting and leading the country,” President Barack Obama added. “We all go forward with a presumption of good faith in our fellow citizens, because that presumption of good faith is essential to a vibrant and functioning democracy.”

    The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin

    But Trump is the very epitome of a bad-faith actor, as noted by Masha Gessen, author of The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. Writing for the New York Review of Books, Gessen, who has lived in autocracies most of her life, and spent much of her career writing about Vladimir Putin’s Russia, laid out a set of six “Rules for Survival” in an autocracy:

    1:  Believe the autocrat. He means what he says.  If you think he’s exaggerating, that’s just your instinct to rationalize the unacceptable. (Sidenote: The U.S. press did this with Hitler back in the 1930s. It did not end well.)

    160308092500-02-trump-pledge-0308-large-tease 2:  Do not be taken in by small signs of normality. Indeed, books like They Thought They Were Free, written in 1955, make it quite clear that superficial normalcy was one of Nazi Germany’s most malignant features.

    3:  Institutions will not save you. America’s institutions are much stronger than Russia’s where Gessen learned this lesson first-hand. “Many of these institutions are enshrined in political culture rather than in law, and all of them—including the ones enshrined in law—depend on the good faith of all actors to fulfill their purpose and uphold the Constitution,” he notes. It’s precisely that good faith that Trump has been waging war against for the past 18 months. The press is already under serious assault—as a proliferation of fake news sites and stories helped Trump get elected—and the courts are surely not far behind.

    4: Be outraged. Even though—following Rule No. 1—you’re not surprised. “This will lead people to call you unreasonable and hysterical, and to accuse you of overreacting,” Gessen warns. “It is no fun to be the only hysterical person in the room. Prepare yourself.”

    5:  Don’t make compromises. Gessen offers Ted Cruz as Exhibit ‘A’ of what not to do. “Those who argue for cooperation will make the case, much as President Obama did in his speech, that cooperation is essential for the future,” he warns. “They will be willfully ignoring the corrupting touch of autocracy, from which the future must be protected.”

    6:  Remember the future is Gessen’s last rule, and it carries a glimmer of hope—but also a message of responsibility: “Nothing lasts forever,” he writes.  “Donald Trump certainly will not, and Trumpism, to the extent that it is centered on Trump’s persona, will not either.” But it was failure to imagine the future that helped hand Trump the election in the first place. Democrats “offered no vision of the future to counterbalance Trump’s all-too-familiar white-populist vision of an imaginary past.”

    Gessen isn’t the only one with this sort of background or experience.  Susan Faludi, author of Backlash and Stiffed, has written about Hungary’s recent authoritarian turn, and its echoes Trump’s America.  Trump and Hungarian Prime Minister Orbán “enjoy a certain kissing-cousin resemblance,” she noted, starting with Trump’s wall-building fetish and Orbán’s “thirteen-foot-high razor-wire fence running 110 miles across the Serbian border to keep out Syrian refugees.”  Mexicans and Muslims top Trump’s enemies list, Roma and Jews top Orbán’s.

    Sarah Kendzior is a Saint Louis-based writer, a trained anthropologist who’s done academic research in Central Asian authoritarian states. She was one of the first writers to warn that Trump could be elected president, even before the GOP primaries started.

    Running on American Pain

    In May she wrote an op-ed titled Trump is the smartest candidate: He’s running on American pain.

    “Having studied authoritarian states for over a decade, I would never exaggerate the severity of the threat we now face,” Kendzior recently wrote. “But an American kleptocracy is exactly where President-elect Trump and his backers are taking us.”

    Trump ran, absurdly, as a billionaire “populist,” despite a long record of bullying, abusing, and ripping off the little guy (workers, small business owners, “Trump University” students, stockholders, even his own lawyers), hiring illegal immigrants, outsourcing manufacturing overseas (shirts in Bangladesh, neckties in China, suits in Mexico, etc.) and reaping over $800 million in taxpayer subsidies from New York City alone.

    He’s the quintessential example of the very ultra-rich elite he pretended to run against—even more clannish and prone to nepotism than most—but with two crucial differences: First, he has always had intimate connections with criminal types who provide him extra muscle and leverage (starting with New York mob connections through his lawyer Roy Cohen). Second, he has always played the part of an outsider, ripping off sympathy on behalf of the very people he otherwise routinely plunders.

    Moving toward kleptocracy, as Kendzior warns of, is merely a continuation of how Trump has always operated, but it’s unfolding in concert with the very establishment GOP interests Trump pretended to oppose. Not only will Trump’s worldwide business empire remain intact, but his children, who will run it, will apparently also be involved in his administration, possibly even with security clearances.

    The problematic pattern was explained by MSNBC’s Joy Reid on AM Joy on Nov. 19.

    “There are dictatorships around the world where the leader of the country and his family essentially milk the country and use the presidency and the leadership of the country to enrich their own family,” Reid said. “We haven’t had any example of that in the United States, but I want to look at an example. It seems small, but in a sense it kind of makes the point.

    “Ivanka Trump did her RNC speech and then immediately tweeted out, ‘Here’s the look, you can buy what I have on.’ OK, that’s just one thing. But then you had the 60 Minutes interview, she then had her staff send out a style alert to the media, that the regular mainstream press could promote the [$10,000] bracelet that she had on, that then the American people could buy.  Fast forward to the meeting with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan, they served Trump Water at the meeting.”

    And we’re still almost two months away from Inauguration Day.

    “This is the sort of thing we normally associate with a post-Soviet kleptocracy, or a third world dictatorship,” Washington Post contributor Paul Waldman said in response. “And the stuff that we know about may be the least problematic. It’s the stuff that we don’t know about that we really have to worry about.”

    The Washington Post recently reported on how, “100 foreign diplomats, from Brazil to Turkey, gathered at the Trump International Hotel this week to sip Trump-branded champagne, dine on sliders and hear a sales pitch about the U.S. president-elects newest hotel…. Some attendees won raffle prizes—among them overnight stays at other Trump properties around the world–allowing them to become better acquainted with the business holdings of the new commander in chief.”

    America’s Impending Fascist Rule

    The U.S. government, it seems, is now a marketing arm for Trump enterprises. It’s a long, long way from Jimmy Carter being forced to sell off the single peanut farm he had spent his whole life building. But Carter, of course, was a Democrat.

    Meanwhile, the GOP establishment is more eager than ever to return to its Wall Street friendly roots. Not just in ways that Trump openly signed onto, such as repealing the Dodd-Frank regulations that passed after the financial crisis, but also in ways he seemed to fundamentally oppose, most notably by privatizing Medicare.

    As far back as 2013, Trump told Conservative Political Action Conference that Republicans should not cut Social Security or Medicare because most Americans want to keep the benefits as they stand now. Again, in January, 2015, Trump pledged, at the Iowa Freedom Summit, to save Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid “without cutting it to the bone” by “making the country rich again.” He’s even implied that Medicare could be part of his plan to replace Obamacare.

    Ryan couldn’t disagree more—though he’s not upfront about it.

    While Obamacare actually extended Medicare’s solvency by more than a decade, Ryan is claiming the exact opposite, saying we have to phase out Medicare because of Obamacare. And, he’s very sneaky about it, according to Josh Marshall, of Talking Points Memo.

    “Ryan says current beneficiaries will be allowed to keep their Medicare. But after the cord is cut between current and future beneficiaries, everything is fair game,” Marshall points out.

    There’s another side to Trump’s economic plans, however. Trump plans to spend a trillion dollars on infrastructure over 10 years. Infrastructure spending used to be a bipartisan issue, and for voters, it still is, but not in Washington. Infrastructure spending helps boost the economy, but Republicans under Bush had other priorities—tax cuts for the rich, and expensive foreign wars—and under Obama they had two reasons to oppose it: They had no practical or political wish to help boost the economy, and they had an ideological fetish to pursue: balancing the budget. That fetish goes away whenever a Republican takes office. Deficits exploded under both Reagan and Bush, so there’s no reason not to expect it again.

    This is where Democrats like Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have said they were willing to work with Donald Trump. But David Dayen at the New Republic warns that there are hidden dangers lurking there. The real aim—as with all things Republican—is to funnel a lot of money into private hands.

    It’s a complex arrangement by which investors and contracts get handsomely paid—a built-in 10 percent profit margin for the contractors. But don’t expect infrastructure anywhere it can’t turn a tidy profit through user fees. And that leaves the heartland of Trump’s rural and exurban red America shit out of luck.

    “You may end up with another bridge in New York City or another road in Los Angeles, which can be monetized,” Dayen explained. “But someplace that actually needs infrastructure investment is [dicier] without user fees.”

    This won’t necessarily be a problem for Trump—if he can manipulate, distract attention and shift blame around—the one thing for which he has shown great talent. That’s what autocratic rule all comes down to in the end.

    Read More
  • 1 5 6 7 212