• Harmonizing Forms Inhabit Sculptural Exhibit

    • 03/30/2017
    • Andrea Serna
    • Art
    • Comments are off

    By Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Writer

    The figures at the Transvagrant Gallery imply a sense of undulating bulbous forms. Your instinct wants to interpret them as representational of familiar forms, while your eyes remind you that this is an abstraction.

    The figures make up Ann Weber, Sculpture; it is a reflection through a looking glass.

    PERSONAGES, PERFECT FIT 2014, found cardboard, staples, polyurethane, 75 x 24 x 21 and 77 x 26 x 23 inches Photo courtesy of Ann Weber

    “As nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn’t,” said Alice in Alice Through the Looking Glass.

    There are abundant hints of figuration and recognizable objects — think chess pieces, balloons, human torsos, plant forms and graphic ciphers. Weber’s sculptures are organic. Even though they are created from discarded cardboard, fished out of dumpsters along her walks, they come across as abstract and elegant. She cuts, strips and staples the retrieved material until it requires a keen eye to see that none of her work requires paint or any other form of enhancement to create works of beauty.

    Weber is a transplant to the San Pedro art community. In 2015, she relocated to San Pedro after living and working for 30 years in the San Francisco Bay Area. In a chance meeting with another artist, she was encouraged to visit Los Angeles. She was told that the city had recently built a reputation as a formidable place for the arts. Her friend had more attention in eight months in Los Angeles than he had in 12 years in San Francisco. She began researching studio spaces in Los Angeles almost immediately.

    Another sculptor, Eric Johnson, invited her to visit his studio in San Pedro. She was dazzled by what she saw.

    “It was just so incredibly beautiful,” Weber said. “This is what I had set my heart on. Nothing makes my heart pound faster than seeing the industry and those beautiful Trojan horses of the cranes. The things that inspired me were the ships and the port and the big pile of nets.”

    Mixed in with the natural beauty of the ocean and city scapes, it began to fall in place.

    All this came together to inspire her show.

    The work was created in the two years she has lived in the port city. Pieces such as Moon Over San Pedro, which shows a dark moon reflecting on the harbor waters, display the influence of her new environment. With Hallelujah, the intertwining appendages in her sculptures reach out to grasp each other, imparting not only a sense of joy but of awe. The towering stately figures in Personages, Santa Monica are contrasted by the embrace of Personages, San Pedro.

    Weber quickly came to the attention of Ron Linden, curator of the newly relocated TransVagrant Gallery. Linden says her technique is disarmingly direct, referencing arte povera’s preference for unconventional materials.

    Much of Weber’s inspiration for her art  came from her radical move. Leaving the community that she had called home for 30 years left her conflicted over the positive and negative aspects of her choice.

    “I started playing with the conflict of the positives in coming to Los Angeles and the negatives of leaving my homeland,”  Weber said. “A lot of pieces that are in this show have to deal with positive and negative space.”

    Walking through the exhibits, you notice areas that seem to have a space cut out, leaving a void in the background. It began to look like portals that you see in ships, but Weber said that the word portal refers to the door to a new place. She is working with both the environment and events in her own life, creating a metaphor for her life experiences.

    Ann Weber, Sculpture runs through April 30. TransVagrant Gallery is hosted in Gallery 478 for this exhibit.

    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, through April 30
    Details:  (310) 600-4873; www.transvagrant.com
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

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  • District Praises Unsung Education Heroes

    • 03/30/2017
    • Terelle Jerricks
    • Feature
    • Comments are off

    By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

    On March 24, Los Angeles Unified School District board member Richard Vladovic honored his district’s best, brightest and often unacknowledged educators of the Los Angeles Harbor Area at Crafted in San Pedro.

    The event reminded me of Random Lengths News’  Change Agent series, which I started several years ago. The series highlights people, groups and organizations contributing to the communities within our circulation area.

    Vladovic’s Heroes in Education dinner was bigger and more grand. The dinner was close to a black tie and gown affair; all of the stops were pulled. It included a huge spread of delectable cuisine, live musical and choreographed performances by this district’s most talented students, as well as special words from LAUSD’s Superintendent Michelle King.

    The unsung heroes included principals, teachers, cafeteria workers, other non-instructional employees, parents, volunteers and supporters of the district.

    “I know it takes all kinds of heroes to help our students throughout the Los Angeles Unified District, and the folks recognized at this event represent all that is good about community and education,” Vladovic said. “This ceremony is an overdue thank you for all of their hard work.”

    “Every day these heroes roll up their sleeves and engage in the transformative but challenging work of empowering our students to reach their full potential,” said King, the keynote speaker. “These heroes never seek recognition or credit, which is why it is so meaningful that we come here today to honor them.”

    This wasn’t the first time Vladovic put on such an event. But ceremonies like this are rare and even rarer outside of District 7.

    .

    Looking around through the sea of students and their parents, educators and community leaders, I spotted a familiar face: Errol “Rod” Sanborn, a former RLn editor who left more than 10 years ago to follow his passion as a teacher.

    I cautiously drew the man’s attention, “Hey Rod, is that you?” I couldn’t be absolutely sure it was Rod. After all, it had been like a decade since I’d seen him. He left and earned his teaching credential. He then went to work at Eagle Tree Continuation School.

    When he turned to see who was calling him, he looked about as surprised to see me as I was to see him.

    “Hey, Terelle, how are you doing?” he said smiling. “I see you’re still at the paper. I know because I still read the paper.”

    As an editor, Sanborn was always one of the smartest people in the room, but his intellect was centered in warmth and grounded in the pure joy of learning and sharing it with others. Even then, he seemed better suited for the classroom than the newsroom, but the staff at Random Lengths News was happy to have him for the short time that we did.

    I later found a program for the event, which included words from either the principal or a school’s committee of an peers as to why their honoree was chosen. The following is what was said of Sanborn:

     It is with great pleasure that our school community recognizes Mr. Sanborn as a Hero in Education. As a teacher at Eagle Tree Continuation HS, he is instrumental in the credit recovery efforts for every student. With over 10 years of service to students and stakeholders at Eagle Tree, his leadership in the past two has propelled the school community  in several school improvement outcomes. As a teacher of three core subject areas (LAUSD A-G graduation requirements), Mr. Sanborn has personally contributed to an increase in credit recovery rate and graduation rate, not just for students at Eagle Tree, but for students in the Carson HS Complex. Mr. Sanborn is absolutely a Hero in Education.

    What struck me was the number of honorees with the warmth, generosity and love of learning that Rod Sanborn embodies.

    .

    Port of Los Angeles High School geography teacher, Jose Ongpauco, is one such example. The school nominators wrote a brief narrative about why they recommended him for the honor:

    “Jose is a selfless, passionate, dedicated educator who not only excels in the classroom but volunteers more of his personal time than any other educator I have ever known.”

    However, dig a little further, and you’ll learn that he’s not an ordinary educator. Ongpauco holds a bachelor’s degree in history and two advanced degrees in education and American history. If that weren’t enough, he is pursuing a graduate degree in policy studies at the Robertson School of Government while teaching. He is also member of several professional and academic associations, such as the American Historical Association.

    I mention all of this because the description of his accolades suggests he spends a great deal of time getting to know his students’ career goals and connecting them to resources to help them fulfill those goals.

    While teachers have a role to play in the furtherance of education, advisors play an integral role beyond the classroom. Adela Retana has taken that role to another level. At Phineas Banning High School, she helps to accelerate the academic achievement of English learners, low-income students and foster youth as the school’s target student population advisor. Her school had the following to say about her:

    In addition to exceeding in meeting her job responsibilities, Ms. Retana also assists in creating opportunities for students’ success, supports and leads implementation of new programs and spends a considerable amount of extra time to assist with school needs.

    The Heroes in Education dinner was a good reminder to honor the people that have touched our lives while they’re here with us in the here-and-now, instead of just relegating them in the dustbin of the fond memories and “do-you-remember-when conversations.”

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  • The Buttertones

    • 03/30/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • Calendar
    • Comments are off

    ENTERTAINMENT

    March 31
    The Buttertones
    The Buttertones combine classic surf tones, seedy characters on both sides of that lineand enough garage, basement punk, and blank generation goth to keep it interesting.
    Time: 7 p.m. March 31
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 433-4996
    Venue: Fingerprints, 420 E. 4th St., Long Beach

    March 31
    Sing Sea Shanties
    Lift your voice and give 21st century life to rollicking songs of days gone by with the Whale and Ale’s talented Sea Shanty group, which meets on the last Friday of each month.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 31
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.whaleandale.com
    Venue: The Whale & Ale, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    April 1
    Missing Persons, Anabella
    Come out to the 80s 4 Life Music Festival featuring legendary 80s artists Missing Persons, Anabella “the original” Bow Wow Wow, Djoir Jordan, Kenny Charles, Unit 287, The Companies and Rockford at the Gaslamp in Long Beach.
    Time: 5 p.m. April 1
    Cost: $20
    Details: gaslamptix.com
    Venue: The Gaslamp, 6251 E Pacific Coast Hwy, Long Beach

    Elton, the Early Years
    Elton, the Early Years has wowed audiences across the state and was recently hand-picked to be featured on Ryan Seacrest’s network AXS TV show, The World’s Greatest Tribute Bands.
    Time: 8 p.m. April 1
    Cost: $25 to $30
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    April 2
    Allan Holdsworth
    Regarded as one of the 20th century’s most prominent guitarists, Allan Holdsworth is one of a handful of musicians who has consistently proven himself as an innovator in between and within the worlds of rock and jazz music.
    Time: 4 p.m. April 2
    Cost: $25 to $30
    Details: www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: Alvas Showroom, 1415 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    Street Corner Renaissance
    Street Corner Renaissance’s soulful, velvety voices blend together in the classic a cappella doo-wop melodies of the 1950s and 1960s.
    Time: 7 p.m. April 2
    Cost: $20 and $25
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    April 7
    Amicus Trio
    This top ensemble emerged from the USC Thornton graduate program. It is comprised of violinist Melody Chang, cellist Coleman Itzkoff, and pianist Alin Melik-Adamyan.
    Time: 12 p.m. April 7
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 316-5574; www.palosverdes.com/ClassicalCrossroads/FirstFridays.htm
    Venue: First Lutheran Church and School, 2900 W. Carson St., Torrance

    April 8
    Gabble Ratchet
    Gabble Ratchet has been the West Coast’s premier Genesis tribute band since 1999. This will be the band’s first performance in two years and will feature Genesis material mainly from the early Peter Gabriel/Phil Collins era of the 1970s.
    Time: 8 p.m. April 8
    Cost: $25
    Details: www.alvasshowroom.com
    Venue: 1415 W. 8th St., San Pedro

    April 22
    Jim Curry
    Jim and Anne Curry deliver the multi-platinum hits of the great John Denver in an evening full of familiar songs. You’ll be invited to sing along, share in the memories, learn new songs and howl at the moon.
    Time: 8 p.m., April 22
    Cost: $25 to $30
    Details: www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    THEATER

    March 31
    Carousel
    Musical Theatre West presents Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical masterpiece.
    Carousel explores the timeless messages of love, hope, forgiveness and redemption.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 31 and April 1, 6, 7 and 8; 1 p.m. March 26, April 2 and 9
    Cost: $20
    Details: (562) 856-1999, ext. 4; www.musical.org,
    Venue: Carpenter Performing Arts Center, 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

    April 2
    Romeo and Juliet
    Elysium Conservatory Theatre opens in their new home with a fantastical reawakening of the greatest love story ever told, William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet. Artistic Director Aaron Ganz has chosen to dive into the very essence of love — weaving stunning choreography, poetry, and music into a theatrical adventure that pushes the very boundaries of possibility.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 31
    Cost: $25
    Details: (424) 535-7333; info@fearlessartists.org
    Venue: Elysium Conservatory Theatre, 729 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

    April 2
    True Tales from The South Bay
    The Torrance Cultural Arts Foundation is proud to present its own local storytellers along with experienced crowd-pleasing guest tellers. Each performance will have a new set of local stories and “all-star tellers.”
    Time: 7 p.m. April 2
    Cost: $10
    Details: www.TorranceArts.org
    Venue: George Nakano Theatre, 3330 Civic Center Drive, Torrance

    April 7
    The Promise
    Romeo and Juliet meets Puerto Rican black magic. In a Puerto Rican enclave in the United States, over-protective and superstitious Guzman finds out that his daughter has fallen in love with his rival’s son and he formulates a treacherous scheme using black magic traditions from Puerto Rico to keep the young lovers apart. However, he quickly learns that his manipulation has led to consequences he never imagined.
    Time: 8 p.m. April 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 21 and 22, and 2 p.m. April 9 and 23
    Cost: $10 to $15
    Details: www.csudh.edu/theatre/tickets
    Venue: Edison Studio Theatre, California State University Dominguez Hills, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

    April 22
    Earth Tales
    Earth Tales, presented by We Tell Stories, will delight kids of all ages with its educational and entertaining stories. This one-hour show is free and open to all members of the community, but seats are limited, so reservations are required.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., April 22
    Cost: Free
    Details: (562) 495-4595; ict@ictlongbeach.org
    Venue: Beverly O’Neill Theatre, 330 E. Seaside Way, Long Beach

    FILM

    April 2
    Lunafest
    Mark your calendar for the Junior League of Long Beach’s 6th annual Lunafest, a film festival featuring nine short films made by, for and about women, as well as a fundraiser to support the league’s upcoming year.
    Time: 11 a.m. April 2
    Cost: $55
    Details: www.jllb.org
    Venue: Art Theatre Long Beach, 2025 E. 4th St., Long Beach

    April 6
    The Jungle Book
    Part of the ship’s ongoing Salon Series community services program, the complimentary Jungle Book screening will be presented in the beautiful art deco Britannia Salon. The film is a live-action remake of the original animated classic produced in 1967 — the same year the Queen Mary first arrived in Long Beach.
    Time: 6 p.m. April
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.eventbrite.com/e/salon-series-the-jungle-book-tickets-32518569918
    Venue: Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

    ARTS

    April 1
    Knockdown Dash and Broken Ground
    Angels Gate Cultural Center hosts two new exhibitions that address distinct issues concerning housing and development in Southern California through a variety of mediums and visual strategies. In Knockdown Dash by Nicole Capps and James McCarthy and Broken Ground by John Hulsey and collaborators, the artists draw on their personal experiences to explore structural concerns. Time: 1 to 4 p.m. April 1 through May 22
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://angelsgateart.org
    Venue: Angels Gate Cultural Center, 3601 Gaffey St., San Pedro

    April 3
    Threesome
    The exhibition Threesome featuring multimedia artist Brian Bernhard, ceramic artist Nora Chen and mixed media and digital artist Miyuki Sena opens at the Artists’ Studio Gallery at the Promenade on the Peninsula on April 3.  The exhibition continues until May 14.
    There will be an opening reception from 4 to 8 p.m. on April 8.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, through May 14
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 265-2592; artists-studio-pvac.com
    Venue: Promenade on the Peninsula, 550 Deep Valley Drive, #159, Rolling Hills Estates

    April 6  
    Visions of Peru
    Come and explore Peru through the photographic exhibit of featured artist, Monique Pineda, together with poetry reading of Cristina Acha and the melodious music played by violinist, Chelsea Ayllon.
    Time: 6 to 9 p.m. April 6
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 833-0103
    Venue: Croatian Cultural Center, 510 W. 7th St., San Pedro

    April 6
    Artist/Mother
    Artist/Mother is a multi-media exhibition that presents the works of Calida Rawles and Mother Naturalist, Julia Barbee, Camilla Løhren Chmiel and Megan Schvaneveldt. These artists are confronted with the challenge: “What do my identities of both artist and mother mean for my practice?”
    Time: 6 to 9 p.m. April 6 through May 20
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 429 0973; www.southbaycontemporary.org
    Venue: South Bay Contemporary at the Loft, 401 S. Mesa St., 3rd Floor, San Pedro

    April 9
    Frank Brothers: The Store That Modernized Modern
    The exhibition relates the story of Southern California’s largest and most prominent mid-century retailer of modern furniture and design. Based in Long Beach from 1938 – 1982, Frank Bros. embodied the optimistic postwar ethos of the American consumer.
    Date: 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, through April 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: csulb.edu/org/uam
    Venue: California State University Long Beach, University Art Museum, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach

    April 16
    Wearable Expressions
    Wearable Expressions explores the unbreakable bond between Art and Fashion portraying boundary-pushing works in fiber, jewelry and accessories by creative minds from around the globe.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through April 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: wearableexpressions.com
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 W. Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    April 26
    Creative Expressions
    Creative Expressions, featuring glass artist Howard Schneider, local painter Kathie Reis and abstract artist Lois Olsen opens at the Artists’ Studio Gallery at the Promenade on the Peninsula.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through April 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 265-2592; www.artists-studio-pvac.com
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center/Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education, at 5400 Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    April 30
    Ann Weber, Sculpture
    TransVagrant and Gallery 478 present Ann Weber, Sculpture. Ann Weber’s organic sculpture is abstract, formally elegant, and composed of inelegant salvaged cardboard. Weber’s technique is disarmingly direct.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, through April 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 600-4873;  www.transvagrant.com
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 7th. St., San Pedro

    May 21
    Dreamland
    The Museum of Latin American Art presents a retrospective of the work of one of the original Los Four founders, Frank Romero in the exhibition titled Dreamland. Romero’s most iconic works, including his mural work, such as Driving to the Olympics on the Hollywood Freeway, address life in the barrios of Los Angeles.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, through May 21
    Cost: $7 to $10
    Details: (562) 437-1689; molaa.org
    Venue: Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    COMMUNITY

    April 1
    Lowrider Lowdown: A Brief History
    On April 1, professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies at Cal State University Northridge Denise M. Sandoval and world-famous tattoo artist Mister Cartoon will provide a brief history and cultural context of lowriders. Also, pinstriping artists D.A. Garcia and Jowee Ramirez aka Mr. Rhythm demonstrate their precision craft. Also see an exhibition of lowriders and a hydraulics demonstration, courtesy of the original Danny D’s Custom Paint & Pinstriping.
    Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. April 1
    Cost: $10
    Details: molaa.org
    Venue: MOLAA, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    April 1
    Autism Resource Fair
    Join the 5K run or walk to raise awareness on resources available to families members with autism. There will also be resource booths, games and entertainment.
    Time: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 1
    Cost: $10
    Details: (310) 835-0212, ext. 1470
    Venue: Veterans Park, 22400 Moneta Ave., Carson

    Sea Salt Workshop
    Explore Terranea by Land and Sea with an experience highlighting the resort’s farm-to-Terranea philosophy. Sea Salt Workshop attendees will enjoy an intimate workshop, salt pairing, and wine as they learn about the resort’s sea salt harvesting process with Terranea’s award-winning chefs.
    Time: 10 a.m. April 1
    Cost: $70
    Details: (310) 265-2885
    Venue: Terranea Resort, 100 Terranea Way, Rancho Palos Verdes

    April 7
    Discovery Lecture Series
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium and Altasea present a lecture by Dr. Kristy L. Forsgren of California State University Fullerton on the importance of understanding fish reproduction. Understanding fish reproduction may be the key to protecting the world’s fisheries.
    Time: 7 p.m. April 7
    Cost: Free
    Details: lecture@cmaqua.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    April 7
    Toyota Long Beach Grand Prix
    The roar of turbocharged engines heralds the return of three days of nonstop racing excitement to the city streets at the 43rd Annual Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach..
    Time: April 7 to 9
    Cost: $65 to $90
    Details: www.gplb.com
    Venue: Downtown Long Beach

    April 8
    Fantasea:
    Step aboard for a celebration of mystifying magic and imagination as world class magicians and award-winning illusionists come together for one spellbinding day. Enjoy parlor shows and close up magic World Famous Magic Castle magicians.
    Time: 12 to 6 p.m. April 8
    Cost: $29 to $99
    Details: (310) 833-3336
    Venue: The Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Hwy, Long Beach
    Curator’s Tour
    Join Battleship Iowa’s Curator Dave Way on this never-before-seen in-depth look at the Battleship IOWA. This four-and-a-half hour tour includes a short film on the tow of Iowa from San Francisco to Los Angeles, an hour-long history presentation, an hour-and-a-half guided tour to decks that are off limits to everyday guests, a behind the scenes presentation of compartments that are still off limits, a Q-and-A session, souvenir photo and a buffet lunch.
    Time: 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 8
    Cost: $17.95
    Details: www.pacificbattleship.com
    Venue: Battleship USS Iowa, 250 S. Harbor Blvd., Berth 87, San Pedro

    April 14
    Flashlight Easter Egg Hunt
    Take a selfie with the Easter Bunny and join in on an evening of fun with games and activities for the whole family. The event is free for children between the ages of 4 to 15 years old. Bring your own flashlight.
    Time: 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 14
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 329-7717
    Venue: 703 E. Del Amo Blvd., Carson

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  • Coastal Port Committee

    ANNOUNCEMENTS

    Coastal Port Committee

    The Coastal San Pedro Port Committee will discuss the China Shipping Settlement, the Harbor Boulevard Realignment and Public Market, and Fleet Week.
    Time: 6 p.m. March 27
    Details: www.cspnc.org
    Venue: Marine Exchange Conference Room, 3601 S. Gaffey St., #803, San Pedro

    Pulse of the Ports

    The 13th annual “Pulse of the Ports: Peak Season Forecast” will feature a panel discussion with industry experts who will provide their thoughts and expectations for the upcoming peak season and the effects of new container alliances beginning in April
    Time: 7 p.m. March 29
    Details: www.polb.com/pulsersvp
    Venue: Long Beach Convention Center Grand Ballroom, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach
     

    Waterfront Development Meeting

    The Port of Los Angeles will host a public meeting ont eh status of the Wilmington Waterfront Development Program.
    Time: 6 to 8 p.m. March 30
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/WaterfrontMeeting, lawaterfront.org
    Venue:
    Banning’s Landing Community Center, 100 E. Water St., Long Beach
     

    Call for Artwork

    The Aquarium of the Pacific will host its annual Urban Ocean Festival on April 29 and 30.
    In partnership with the Arts Council, the Aquarium also holds an annual juried art contest and displays the winning artwork at the festival. Winners are selected in three categories – painting/drawing, photography and sculpture – and receive $500, with one grand prize winner receiving an additional $250. The deadline to submit to the contest is March 31.
    Details: aquariumofpacific.org
     

    Long Beach Advisory Commission on Disabilities Transportation Town Hall

    The Long Beach Citizen’s Advisory Commission on Disabilities will be hosting a public town hall meeting regarding transportation issues.
    Time: 12:30 p.m. March 31
    Venue: Cesar Chavez Park, 401 Golden Ave., Long Beach
     

    Monthly Beach Cleanup

    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium invites the public to participate in its monthly beach clean-up.
    Volunteers learn about coastal habitat, the growing amount of marine debris within it, and the benefits of protecting this ecosystem.
    Time: 8 to 10 a.m. April 1
    Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium , 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro.
     

    Pathways to Employment Youth Event

    This annual event is designed to assist Harbor Area youth ages 16 to 24 with the skills they need to apply for jobs, get hired, and successfully navigate every day work life.
    Time: 9 a.m. April 1
    Details: http://nwsanpedro.org/pathways-to-employment
    Venue: San Pedro High School John Olguin Campus, 3210 S. Alma St., San Pedro
     

    Public Safety Meeting

    A public safety meeting is scheduled to address community concerns and questions
    Time: 8 to 10 a.m. April 1
    Details: (562) 570-7777; district7@longbeach.gov
    Venue: Long Beach Job Corps Center, 1903 Santa Fe Ave., Long Beach
     

    Help Reinvent the Heart of Downtown San Pedro

    Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn wants to hear youth thoughts on the land use options for the San Pedro Courthouse site. RSVP by April 3.
    Time: 6 p.m. April 5 or 10 a.m. April 15
    Details: heartofsandpedro@dpw.lacounty.gov
    Venue: Port of Los Angeles High School Multipurpose Room, 250 W. 5th St., San Pedro
     

    People’s State of the City

    Long Beach Rising Coalition is hosting the 6th Annual People’s State of the City
    Time:  5 p.m. April 5
    Details: www.bhclongbeach.org/lbrising
    Venue: First Congregational Church, 241 Cedar Ave., Long Beach
     

    AOC7’s 5th Annual Literacy Fair

    In preparation for AOC7’s 5th Annual Literacy Fair, the group, whose acronym stands for Anaheim, Orange, Cherry and 7th Street, is collecting new and gently used children’s books through April 28.
    Donations locations:
    Neighborhood Resource Center
    100 Broadway, Suite 550, Long Beach

    Lincoln Elementary School
    1175 E. 11th St., Long Beach

    Mark Twain Library
    1401 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    The Center Long Beach
    2017 E. 4th St., Long Beach

    POLA Community Investment Grant 2017

    Applications for the Port of Los Angeles Community Investment Grant Program for Fiscal Year 2017-18 are now available. Up to $1 million in grants will help support initiatives, programs and events benefiting the Los Angeles Harbor communities. Applications are due by 5 p.m. May 8.
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/POLACommunityGrant2017
     

    Together We Will Long Beach/South Bay

    Together We Will Long Beach/South Bay is a growing group of local, caring, everyday people who came together as part of the resistance movement following the election of Donald Trump. Whether you are looking for like-minded people or are interested in influencing our political system, you have come to the right place. See how you can volunteer.
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/TWW-Long-Beach-South-Bay

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  • Queen Mary Needs About $300 Million for Repairs

    • 03/23/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • Briefs
    • Comments are off

    LONG BEACH — A recent marine study found that the Queen Mary is at risk of its hull collapsing and flooding due to corrosion. Corroded pillars also could lead to the collapse of an area. Should that happen, there are no watertight doors or working pumps to remove the water. Flood prevention requires more than $5 million in immediate repairs, and somewhere between $235 million and $289 million in work over the next five years, to prevent an internal collapse.

    At the request of Long Beach officials, naval architects and vessel experts conducted the survey to assess the structural condition of the ship.

    Steel corrosion has resulted in one-and-a-half-inch thin tank top rusted away. The report predicts that at the rate of corrosion some internal collapse of the Queen Mary’s structure will take place within 10 years.

    The tank tops act as a platform for machinery and cargo. Longstanding failure of the bilge system and leaks in the sewage holding tanks caused the corrosion. The watertight compartment walls of the ship were removed during retrofitting work the 1960s, making an area of the hull at risk for leakage and flooding.

    About $23 million has been approved to address the most urgent repairs. a plan to build entertainment around the ship would generate the tens of millions of dollars needed to do more repairs.

    The ship was built in the 1930s in Clydebank, Scotland. Long Beach purchased the Queen Mary about 50 years ago after it was retired. The ship now is a floating hotel with shops, restaurants and event areas.

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  • The Whale & Ale: One Pub, Hold The Gastro

    • 03/23/2017
    • Richard Foss
    • Features
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    By Richard Foss, Cuisine and Restaurant Writer

    There’s something attractive about a classic English pub even if there isn’t a single British chromosome in your DNA.

    It’s the polar opposite of an eat-and-run establishment: a place designed to be comfortable, to encourage you to linger over just one more beer, to listen to just one more song and perhaps even sing along.

    British pubs have only one problem: English food is not particularly fashionable these days. The bland and carelessly made fare in London pubs  inspired the gastropub revolution, which modernized bar food across the world. The downside of that revolution is that many people who are happy paying high prices for fancy burgers and other novelties have forgotten the joys of the eclipsed hearty traditional fare.

    Those old-fashioned specialties are very well presented at The Whale & Ale in San Pedro, which has been run by Andrew Silber since 1995. Silber is from Northern England. He ran a successful restaurant in London before coming to the United States, so he knows English cuisine and is a champion of making it correctly. The Whale & Ale menu is stocked with pub classics like sausage rolls in pastry, shepherd’s pie, fish and chips, and chicken curry. On any given night, you’re likely to hear the accents of expatriates who have come in for a taste of home.

    If you’re wondering about curry being on a list of British specialties, it’s worth noting that curry powder was sold in England at least as early as the 1790s. Those who think that everyone who lives in the British Isles prefer their food bland will have an awakening if they ask for it spicy here; while it doesn’t greatly resemble standard Indian curries, the pub variant can raise a sweat. For that matter, there are more spicy condiments that are traditionally British; the banger sausages served alongside the ploughman’s lunch and other dishes are flavored with gentle herbs, but those who crave a kick can hit them with spicy Coleman’s mustard and enjoy the burn. Freshly baked soda bread and butter is at every table. It is handy if you overdo it with the hot stuff.

    The most popular item appears to be fish and chips. That’s the meal you’re most like to see on the platters heading for tables. The fish is Atlantic true cod, which is more expensive than many of the common substitutes but delivers thick, flaky filets with mild flavor. The Whale & Ale kitchen has decades of practice battering and frying it so that the batter is crisp and not greasy. They deliver every time.

    The fish and chip plate demonstrates a point about the food here: it’s measured on execution rather than innovation. This doesn’t mean The Whale & Ale offers no novelties for those who want to try something new; a few items on the menu here are so rarely encountered that most people have never tasted them before.

    One of these is roast duck in Cumberland sauce, which is red currant berries simmered in port wine with citrus and a hint of ginger. The tart berries and sweet wine cook into a fruity, aromatic sweet and sour sauce, one ideally suited to flavorful duck meat. The flavor balance is almost reminiscent of some sauces used in Vietnamese cuisine, but this is no fusion dish — there are recipes for it going back to the early 1800s. Try it here and you will wonder how this could have ever gone out of fashion.

    Another classic dish is Beef Wellington, a filet mignon coated with a mushroom and seasoning mix, wrapped in puff pastry and baked. One can hazard a guess about why this is no longer on most restaurant menus: it’s time-consuming and most restaurant cooks can’t do it well to save their lives. The steak has to be seared and partly cooked before wrapping; it finishes cooking in the oven. If any part of it is done wrong, you get soggy pastry or overdone or underdone meat. The Whale & Ale’s kitchen has that timing down and the thick filet came out the medium rare I requested with the pastry crisped to flaky perfection. The portion was almost enough for two, so you might split this and a lighter dish with someone and enjoy an aristocratic treat.

    British desserts have a well-deserved reputation for being rich and sweet, so here again you might want to split one with someone and order another if you still have room. I recommend the sticky toffee pudding — a confection of caramel with ground dates in a warm cake topped by vanilla ice cream — or the raisin bread pudding. If those and the other offerings don’t ring your bell, you can always have an after-dinner drink from the full bar.

    Musicians James Hendricks and Simon Spalding make The Whale & Ale a regular stop when they are in town. Photo by Jessie Drezner

    For decades, The Whale & Ale has successfully pleased a clientele that includes both homesick Brits and locals who experienced this food here for the first time. Whether it was a revelation or just a reminder of the joys of a good pub, those satisfied people have made this a mainstay of the local dining scene, a place to come for a pint in friendly surroundings or for something more substantial.

    The Whale & Ale is at 327 W. 7th St., in San Pedro.

    Details: (310) 832-0363; www.whaleandale.com

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  • Funkalicious

    • 03/23/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • Calendar
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    ENTERTAINMENT

    March 24
    Funkalicious
    Get out your grooviest 70s gear and get ready to dance. Funkalicious is the New Generation of Funk Music, taking you back to the fun times of the 70s and 80s.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 24
    Cost: $16 to $101
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/lokxdna
    Venue: Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    March 25
    El Segundo 100th Anniversary Concert
    Two-thousand-seventeen marks the 100th anniversary of the City of El Segundo. To help celebrate this tremendous milestone the El Segundo Concert Band and the South Bay Music Association present the El Segundo 100th Anniversary Concert. The celebration will focus on music from the era the city was founded.
    Time: 7 p.m. March 25
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.esconcertband.org
    Venue: El Segundo High School Auditorium, 640 Main St., El Segundo

    March 25
    Perla Batalla sings Leonard Cohen

    The Grammy-nominated vocalist wraps her exquisite voice around the Leonard Cohen songbook. Batalla was once a back-up singer for k.d. lang, Iggy Pop, The Gipsy Kings and Cohen.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 25
    Cost: $25 to $55
    Details: (310) 833-4813; www.grandvision.org
    Venue: Grand Annex, 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

    THEATER

    March 24
    Carousel
    Musical Theatre West presents Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical masterpiece.
    Carousel explores the timeless messages of love, hope, forgiveness, and redemption.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 24, 25 and 31, and April 1, 6, 7 and 8; 1 p.m. March 26, April 2 and 9; and 2 p.m. April 2 and 8
    Cost: $20
    Details: (562) 856-1999, ext. 4; www.musical.org,
    Venue: Carpenter Performing Arts Center, 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

    March 25
    Rumors
    In a large, tastefully appointed townhouse, the Deputy Mayor of New York has shot himself. Though only a flesh wound, four couples are about to experience a severe farce attack. Despite being his tenth wedding anniversary party, the host lies bleeding in the other room and his wife is nowhere in sight. The lawyer and his wife must get “the story” straight before the other guests arrive.
    Time: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sunday, through March 25
    Cost: $14 to $20
    Details: (562) 494-1014; www.lbplayhouse.org
    Venue: Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

    March 31
    Romeo and Juliet Rehearsals
    You are invited to Elysium for each and every Romeo and Juliet rehearsal.
    Time:  6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, until March 31
    Cost: Free
    Details: www.fearlessartists.org/box-office-1
    Venue: Elysium, 729 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

    April 2
    Letters From Young Gay Men
    Letters from Young Gay Men is a project that was inspired by Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet. It is show that brings a unique intimacy between the gay youth and elders of the community.
    Time: 8 p.m. Saturdays and 6 p.m. Sundays through April 2
    Cost: $25
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/letterstogaymen
    Venue: Studio C Artists, 6448 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles

    ARTS

    April 3
    Threesome
    The exhibition Threesome featuring multimedia artist Brian Bernhard, ceramic artist Nora Chen and mixed media and digital artist Miyuki Sena opens at the Artists’ Studio Gallery at the Promenade on the Peninsula on April 3.  The exhibition continues until May 14.
    There will be an opening reception from 4 to 8 p.m. on April 8.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, through May 14
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 265-2592; artists-studio-pvac.com
    Venue: Promenade on the Peninsula, 550 Deep Valley Drive, #159, Rolling Hills Estates

    April 9
    Frank Brothers: The Store That Modernized Modern
    The exhibition relates the story of Southern California’s largest and most prominent mid-century retailer of modern furniture and design. Based in Long Beach from 1938 – 1982, Frank Bros. embodied the optimistic postwar ethos of the American consumer.
    Date: 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, through April 9
    Cost: Free
    Details: csulb.edu/org/uam
    Venue: California State University Long Beach, University Art Museum, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach

    April 16
    Wearable Expressions

    Wearable Expressions explores the unbreakable bond between Art and Fashion portraying boundary-pushing works in fiber, jewelry and accessories by creative minds from around the globe.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through April 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: wearableexpressions.com
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 W. Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    April 26
    Creative Expressions
    Creative Expressions, featuring glass artist Howard Schneider, local painter Kathie Reis and abstract artist Lois Olsen opens at the Artists’ Studio Gallery at the Promenade on the Peninsula. An opening reception is scheduled from 2 to 5 p.m. March 4.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays, through April 16
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 265-2592; www.artists-studio-pvac.com
    Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center/Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education, at 5400 Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes

    April 30
    Ann Weber, Sculpture
    TransVagrant and Gallery 478 present Ann Weber, Sculpture. Ann Weber’s organic sculpture is abstract, formally elegant and composed of inelegant salvaged cardboard. There are abundant hints of figuration and recognizable objects: think chess pieces, balloons, human torsos, plant forms, and graphic ciphers.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, through April 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 600-4873; www.transvagrant.com
    Venue: Gallery 478, 478 W. 4th St., San Pedro

    May 6
    Bits
    The Artist Co-Op is proud to announce the opening of Bits, a four-person exhibition. Both two- and three-dimensional works by Ivan Deavy Zapien, Angelica Fegley, Keith Fegley and Katie Stubblefield will be presented.
    Time: through May 6
    Cost: Free
    Details: kestubblefield@verizon.net
    Venue: Artist Co-Op, 1330 Gladys Ave., Long Beach

    May 21
    Dreamland
    The Museum of Latin American Art presents a retrospective of the work of one of the original Los Four founders, Frank Romero in the exhibition entitled Dreamland. Romero’s most iconic works, including his mural work, such as Driving to the Olympics on the Hollywood Freeway, address life in the barrios of Los Angeles.
    Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, through May 21
    Cost: $7 to $10
    Details: (562) 437-1689; molaa.org
    Venue: Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

    COMMUNITY

    March 25
    Rancho Days
    Be part of Rancho Day on the Rancho San Pedro. Experience life in the 1800s before California became part of the United States. This fun and interactive day will focus on what life was like on the Rancho San Pedro in Alta California.
    Time: 12 to 4 p.m. March 25
    Cost: Free
    Details: (310) 895-5736; www.dominguezrancho.org
    Venue: Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum, 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez

    March 25
    Long Beach Live
    Councilman Roberto Uranga invites to support talented local performers, including singers, comics, poets, dancers and storytellers for a free public event.
    Time: 7 to 10 p.m. March 25
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/LongBeachLive
    Venue: The Mirage Grill, 539 E. Bixby, Long Beach

    March 29
    Meet the Grunions
    Grunions are small sardine-size fish of the silversides family, which are one of the few fish species in the world that actually come ashore to lay their eggs on sandy beaches.  They are found from central California through Baja California, with Cabrillo Beach being one of the better places to observe the fish.
    Time: 8 p.m. March 29
    Cost: $5
    Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org
    Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive, San Pedro

    March 30
    CITT Town Hall Meeting
    The Center for International Trade and Transportation will commemorate its 20th anniversary with a State of the Trade and Transportation Industry Town Hall meeting. People who work within the trade and transportation industries are encouraged to attend. Seating is limited.
    Time: 6 to 8 p.m. March 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://tinyurl.com/CITTTownHall
    Venue: CSULB, Gerald Daniel Recital Hall, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach

    March 30
    Spit ’n’ Argue
    Enjoy an evening at Harvey Milk Park by taking part in a debate club.
    Time: 6 to 8 p.m. March 30
    Cost: Free
    Details: http://innovatelb.com/showcase
    Venue: Harvey Milk Park, E. 3rd St., Long Beach

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  • Lowenthal’s Conversation About America

    • 03/20/2017
    • Reporters Desk
    • News
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    LONG BEACH — On March 13, Rep. Alan Lowenthal hosted A Conversation About America Town Hall at Long Beach City College.
    The town hall, which filled the school’s auditorium, included guest speakers discussing the future of the Affordable Care Act, Social Security and Medicare. The panel also discussed immigration and refugee policy under the Donald Trump administration, as well as well as the ongoing struggle to protect the environment and further civil rights for all Americans. The event was met with a small group of Trump supporters.

    Photographer Diana Lejins covered the events that took place that night.

    Rep. Alan Lowenthal addressed constituents at a town hall meeting March 13. Photo by Diana Lejins


    A handful of Trump supporters continually disrupted the Long Beach town hall meeting on March 13, waving signs, shouting and making loud noises. Photo by Diana Lejins


    The Long Beach City College auditorium was packed with more than 1,000 constituents at a town hall meeting March 13 sponsored by Rep. Alan Lowenthal. Photo by Diana Lejins


    Panelists Immigrant Rights Coalition Alicia Morales, ACLU James Gillian and Dr. Elisa Nicholas from the Long Beach Children’s Clinic answered questions from the audience at a Townhall meeting March 13 hosted by Long Beach City College. Photo by Diana Lejins

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  • Local Band Hangout Jams with Elan Atias

    • 03/17/2017
    • Melina Paris
    • Music
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    By Melina Paris, Music Columnist

    Elan Atias of the Wailers recently performed a special acoustic set while hanging at the Queen Mary’s Observation Bar. The jam was the third concert of Local Band Hangout, a live music series.

    Atias is best known for performing with The Wailers on and off from 1997 to 2010; he was lead their singer 1997 to 1999. His voice sounds astonishingly like Bob Marley’s. However, he has been influenced by a wide variety of artists, from Fela Kuti inspired African rhythms and 1980s new wave bands such as Depeche Mode, to The Beatles and rhythm and blues artists such as Otis Reading.

    He has been busy with several new releases including a reggae style cover of Chris Isaacs’ Wicked Game. He has also just released a single on a side project with Coldcut x On-U Sound’s album in the United Kingdom with a stream of Divide and Rule. And, his single, Sit Upon My Throne on has his own label, 1 Lion Records, is due in April.

    His material always delivers a positive message that is often inspired from everyday life occurrences.

    “I try to write very simple so that even a baby can understand, but still deep and cryptic to compel thought and so [the audience] can relate it to their own lives,” Atias said.

    One example of how he’s done that is through his encounter with Dr. Roots (Larry Singer), had come to some of the Wailers’ shows in Colorado.

    “He had the idea to incorporate traditional Jewish prayers and life experiences that related to the meaning of the prayers with English lyrics,” Atias said. “His love of reggae was enormous and our connection made the perfect sense.”

    Atias looks forward to lots of work, more releases, shows and inspiration. Doing what he loves and sharing it with the world is what is most fulfilling to him, especially when it comes to helping people get through hard times.

    Long Beach’s own folk jazz duo Queen Califia also graced the stage of the Local Band Hangout.

    “It is exciting to see music fans fill the Observation Bar each month to support these local artists in a venue that has hosted so many celebrated performers.” said Steve Sheldon, Queen Mary’s director of events and entertainment.

    Tickets are $10 and the admission ticket value can be used in the Observation Bar and at Queen Mary restaurants during the concerts.

    Details: www.queenmary.com;  http://elanmusic.com

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  • 24 Million Will Lose Health Insurance Under GOP Plan

    • 03/17/2017
    • Paul Rosenberg
    • Briefs
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    On March 13, the Congressional Budget Office released its analysis of the GOP health care bill, warning that 14 million more people would be uninsured in 2018, a number that would increase to 24 million by 2026.

    The CBO estimates are routinely recognized as the most authoritative basis for projecting the impact of legislation. The budget office did not address increased mortality, but the best estimates from past studies indicate that more than 1,000 additional deaths will result for every one million people without insurance.

    “The reductions in insurance coverage between 2018 and 2026 would stem in large part from changes in Medicaid enrollment,” the report said. “In 2026, an estimated 52 million people would be uninsured, compared with 28 million who would lack insurance that year under current law.”

    CBO also found that $880 billion would be cut from Medicaid by 2026 and 15 percent of Planned Parenthood patients would lose access to care. A 64-year-old making $26,500 would pay $14,600 for insurance in 2026, compared to $1,700 under Obamacare.

    “If you’re looking at the CBO for accuracy, you’re looking in the wrong place,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, the week before, in a desperate preemptive attack

    But GOP attacks on the office failed to unify behind Trump once the report was announced.

    “I’m pretty encouraged,” Speaker Paul Ryan told reporters. “It actually exceeded my expectations.”

    Trump’s Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price stood out by continuing the attacks.

    “We strenuously disagree with the report,” said Price, attacking the 14 million figure as “unbelievable.”

    When Price was chairman of the House Budget Committee, he was deeply involved in selecting CBO’s director, Keith Hall, in 2015. Presumably, Price believed in Hall’s analytical judgment at the time.

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