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Published on September 3rd, 2013 | by Zamná Ávila

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Environmental Review for Yang Ming Terminal Improvements Begins

SAN PEDRO — The Port of Los Angeles announced, Aug. 27, that it is initiating the environmental review process on a proposed berth-improvement project by Yang Ming, a Taiwanese marine transport company.

The start of the environmental process, which is expected to formally begin this fall with a Notice of Preparation, is the first step in Yang Ming’s plan to enhance its terminal facilities and deepen its berth to accommodate 14,000 Twenty Foot Equivalent (TEU) vessels and increase cargo volume.

In May, executives from Yang Ming and the Port of Los Angeles signed a term sheet agreement at Chi-Du, Taiwan Yang Ming Headquarters to perform a number of key improvements that will enhance the Yang Ming terminal facilities.

As part of the agreement, the Port plans to invest $122 million in improvements at the terminal, including construction of a new 1,260 linear foot wharf at Berths 126-129, dredging to a depth of -53 feet at the newly constructed wharf, and expansion of the West Basin Intermodal Container Transfer Facility. The West Basin Container Terminal is a partnership between Yang Ming, China Shipping and Ports America.  

Yang Ming’s current lease at the West Basin Container Terminal ends in 2021. This agreement will extend the lease to 2030, delivering between $365 and $525 million in port revenue, depending on cargo volumes.

In addition to the term sheet agreement with Yang Ming, the Los Angeles officials also signed a Memorandum of Understanding with officials of the partners of the West Basin Container Terminal to promote business and trade with the city and POLA in Beijing.

The Port of Los Angeles has made significant terminal and infrastructure investments in recent years to maintain its competitive edge for decades to come.  The $122 million enhancement of the Yang Ming terminal facilities will complement the port’s five-year, $1.2 billion investment to update terminals, increase rail capacity, and deepen the main channel to allow ships to reach a -53 foot depth and increase the seaborne trade coming through the nation’s busiest container port.

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